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Lud·dite
/ˈlədˌīt/
noun
1.
DEROGATORY
a person opposed to new technology or ways of working.
"a small-minded Luddite resisting progress"
2.
HISTORICAL
a member of any of the bands of English workers who destroyed machinery, especially in cotton and woolen mills, that they believed was threatening their jobs (1811–16).

Yep - I’m an introvert Luddite.
Ah, you shouldn't of done that, now I fell bad.:dunno:

In my working life I've always embraced new technology, its great for making a better quality part faster.

In my private life I don't embrace most new technology as it doesn't really apply to how I live. If it doesn't improve or make my day to day life or make it easier then its a no go.
But I do always look for ways to do a job/work easier or more efficiently.

So I guess I'm not really a Luddite, but I like to think I am and I guess I won't try and convince those that think I am one otherwise.:bigthumb:


On a side note what's real interesting is when you have old school stuff that most have never seen.

In our new House we don't have an electric door bell. We have an old school ringer that's mounted in the middle of the front door. There is a knob with a brass plate around it that says "turn" on it.
When you turn it rings a bell on the inside of the door.

Like this

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=old+fashioned+ringer+door+bell+youtube&view=detail&mid=CDD78A8EE059BAC46800CDD78A8EE059BAC46800&FORM=VIRE

Its amazing how many people don't have a clue what to do. They usually just knock on the door. If they do that I ask them why the didn't use the door bell? Most never bother to look or think.
And the amount of grief that we had to go thru with the builder, electrician and drywallers while building the house was unbelievable.

Its not easy being a Luddite.:laugh:
 

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Its not easy being a Luddite.
We lived off grid for around 8 years - that was around 22 years ago. When I say off grid I mean no utilities at all.

When we moved to this house - which has utilities - we kept most of our basic tools and other items. I am used to using hand tools and have very few power tools.

When the power goes out we are fine - have our Aladdin lights etc. Still have our wood stove. Have water 20’ from the front porch. The only reason I bought a generator a few years ago was to run the A/C - just can’t take the extreme humidity any more.

I don’t use a cell phone because there is no cell service where I live. But I do have a tracfone I keep in the truck in case of an emergency when out - if we are in an area that has cell service....

So yes - it takes a whole lot for me to embrace new technologies. The old stuff works fine for the most part.
 

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What I'd love to see would be the cost over say 100,000 or even better 150,000 miles of EVERYTHING including the initial purchase price. I've always suspected that the cost of gas becomes the largest cost in owning a vehicle if you keep it for 150,000 miles or more. Especially on truck where the average mileage is around 17-18 mpg approx. Now if you spend 80K on truck it may not be but a more realistic price of approx. 35K.
Our company tracks total operating expense of all vehicles. I didn't post that chart. Considering our company has vehicles that are driven by one person and they use that truck for everything, they take them home, and they are maintained at the mfg. maintenance intervals, most of our GM 1500's are at the bottom of the list due to many of them had a transmission replacement around 100,000 to 120,000 miles. This drives the maintenance cost right up.

The Dodge Rams and the Ford F150's run close concerning maintenance costs except for one of the Dodge Ram 1500's that one of the guys that works for me drives. At 120,000 miles we had to replace the engine. Camshaft failed to the point that two cylinders were dead. That obviously didn't set well with me concerning the Hemi, albeit, it was the only Ram that we have had engine problems with so maybe a fluck, it happens.

Normal maintenance costs, E.g. fluid changes, tires, brakes, etc. are very consistent across the board. Operational costs are driven up when a vehicle needs a transmission, engine or other costly component.

We are sort of a unique company in that we buy the make truck the guy wants so we have a mix of all manufacturers so we really know which make truck costs more to operate over many miles.

We depreciate our pickup trucks over 3 - 5 years, depending on who will be driving it. Some of our drivers drive 50,000 miles per year and some 30,000 per year.

The Ford F150 is generally a more expensive truck to buy, although, at the end of 150,000 miles, it is by a large margin the most economical.

Now if you trade your truck in every 3 years with 30,000 miles on it, then it really doesn't matter what you buy, at least based on cost to you.

Fuel cost is absolutely, by a LARGE margin, the number one expense any vehicle has outside of the initial cost of the vehicle. Let me say that again!! The amount of money you spend on fuel for a vehicle is by a large margin, the largest expense category when it comes to operating a vehicle.

If you run a vehicle 150,000 miles and it averages 20 mpg, your vehicle will use 7500 gallons of fuel. 7500 gallons x $2.75/gallon = $20,625
If you run a vehicle 150,000 miles and it averages 18 mpg, your vehicle will use 8333 gallons of fuel. 8333 gallons x $2.75/gallon = $22,915 or $2290 more.
If you run a vehicle 150,000 miles and it averages 16 mpg, you vehicle will use 9375 gallons of fuel. 9375 gallons x $2.75/gallon = $25,781

As you thought, Fuel mileage is huge and is the largest expense in owning a vehicle, outside of the initial cost.

Of course, everything has limits.

One argument that is made is, especially on heavy duty trucks such as the Ford F250, GM 2500 and Ram 2500 is, buy a diesel because rather than a gasoline engine because it gets better fuel mileage, which is true, but!!!!

If you actually do the math, you will never save enough fuel $$$$$'s to pay for the diesel engine. Diesel engines are about a $9000.00 option when buying a new truck. The cost of diesel fuel per gallons is about .50/gallon higher than gasoline.

The average gas engine in a heavy duty truck will average about 14 mpg. in real usage. Again, at 150,000 miles, gasoline usage will be 10,714 gallons. Based on $2.75/gallon, the gas engine truck will use, $29,463 of gasoline in 150,000 miles.

The average diesel engine in a heavy duty truck will average about 19 mpg. Again, at 150,000 miles, diesel fuel usage will be 7894 gallons. Based on $3.30/gallon, the diesel engine truck will use, $26,050 of diesel fuel in 150,000 miles, a difference of $3413. Still $5600 in the hole with the diesel engine.

So, don't buy a diesel engine in a new truck because you think you are going to save enough in fuel mileage to pay for the engine, you will not. If you want the diesel engine because you just want it or you need the extra torque, then go for it, but know for sure, the diesel engine is not going to save you enough $$$$ to pay for it.

The fuel costs per gallon that I used in this illustration are based on average PA fuel costs. I realize that most states, except NYS, have lower fuel prices than PA. That said, overall fuel cost will go down if the price per gallon is lower, but it goes down for all makes of trucks, so cost per gallon is relative.
 

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Discussion Starter #164
Our company tracks total operating expense of all vehicles. I didn't post that chart. Considering our company has vehicles that are driven by one person and they use that truck for everything, they take them home, and they are maintained at the mfg. maintenance intervals, most of our GM 1500's are at the bottom of the list due to many of them had a transmission replacement around 100,000 to 120,000 miles. This drives the maintenance cost right up.

The Dodge Rams and the Ford F150's run close concerning maintenance costs except for one of the Dodge Ram 1500's that one of the guys that works for me drives. At 120,000 miles we had to replace the engine. Camshaft failed to the point that two cylinders were dead. That obviously didn't set well with me concerning the Hemi, albeit, it was the only Ram that we have had engine problems with so maybe a fluck, it happens.

Normal maintenance costs, E.g. fluid changes, tires, brakes, etc. are very consistent across the board. Operational costs are driven up when a vehicle needs a transmission, engine or other costly component.

We are sort of a unique company in that we buy the make truck the guy wants so we have a mix of all manufacturers so we really know which make truck costs more to operate over many miles.

We depreciate our pickup trucks over 3 - 5 years, depending on who will be driving it. Some of our drivers drive 50,000 miles per year and some 30,000 per year.

The Ford F150 is generally a more expensive truck to buy, although, at the end of 150,000 miles, it is by a large margin the most economical.

Now if you trade your truck in every 3 years with 30,000 miles on it, then it really doesn't matter what you buy, at least based on cost to you.

Fuel cost is absolutely, by a LARGE margin, the number one expense any vehicle has outside of the initial cost of the vehicle. Let me say that again!! The amount of money you spend on fuel for a vehicle is by a large margin, the largest expense category when it comes to operating a vehicle.

If you run a vehicle 150,000 miles and it averages 20 mpg, your vehicle will use 7500 gallons of fuel. 7500 gallons x $2.75/gallon = $20,625
If you run a vehicle 150,000 miles and it averages 18 mpg, your vehicle will use 8333 gallons of fuel. 8333 gallons x $2.75/gallon = $22,915 or $2290 more.
If you run a vehicle 150,000 miles and it averages 16 mpg, you vehicle will use 9375 gallons of fuel. 9375 gallons x $2.75/gallon = $25,781

As you thought, Fuel mileage is huge and is the largest expense in owning a vehicle, outside of the initial cost.

Of course, everything has limits.

One argument that is made is, especially on heavy duty trucks such as the Ford F250, GM 2500 and Ram 2500 is, buy a diesel because rather than a gasoline engine because it gets better fuel mileage, which is true, but!!!!

If you actually do the math, you will never save enough fuel $$$$$'s to pay for the diesel engine. Diesel engines are about a $9000.00 option when buying a new truck. The cost of diesel fuel per gallons is about .50/gallon higher than gasoline.

The average gas engine in a heavy duty truck will average about 14 mpg. in real usage. Again, at 150,000 miles, gasoline usage will be 10,714 gallons. Based on $2.75/gallon, the gas engine truck will use, $29,463 of gasoline in 150,000 miles.

The average diesel engine in a heavy duty truck will average about 19 mpg. Again, at 150,000 miles, diesel fuel usage will be 7894 gallons. Based on $3.30/gallon, the diesel engine truck will use, $26,050 of diesel fuel in 150,000 miles, a difference of $3413. Still $5600 in the hole with the diesel engine.

So, don't buy a diesel engine in a new truck because you think you are going to save enough in fuel mileage to pay for the engine, you will not. If you want the diesel engine because you just want it or you need the extra torque, then go for it, but know for sure, the diesel engine is not going to save you enough $$$$ to pay for it.

The fuel costs per gallon that I used in this illustration are based on average PA fuel costs. I realize that most states, except NYS, have lower fuel prices than PA. That said, overall fuel cost will go down if the price per gallon is lower, but it goes down for all makes of trucks, so cost per gallon is relative.
That's all well and good and if I were using a truck to make my living this could be helpful data. But I'm not and never have, you pretty much nailed me in the line I highlighted above. Except I'm a little behind the curve right now with 5 years @ 35000 miles. Just haven't seen anything lately that I like that much better than what I have now, but I will.

I've been buying, selling, trading, repairing/rebuilding vehicles since I was 15 years old. I've had new, used, basket cases, and everything in between. I've owned somewhere between 50 and 100 cars and trucks with the vast majority of them being GM and the vast majority of those being Chevys, so I am partial to them because of my own experiences. I'm now 75 years old and pretty much reduced to just buying and trading. I don't have the desire (or ability) to work on them much anymore, just prefer to own and drive them one at a time now and also prefer to not keep one too long after the warranty runs out. :laugh:

Fuel mileage is not really an important factor for me but I understand it is for many people. Just as the things that are important to me are not to a lot of people. But that's why we have choices.
 

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Now if you trade your truck in every 3 years with 30,000 miles on it, then it really doesn't matter what you buy, at least based on cost to you.
That's all well and good and if I were using a truck to make my living this could be helpful data. But I'm not and never have, you pretty much nailed me in the line I highlighted above. Except I'm a little behind the curve right now with 5 years @ 35000 miles. Just haven't seen anything lately that I like that much better than what I have now, but I will.

I've been buying, selling, trading, repairing/rebuilding vehicles since I was 15 years old. I've had new, used, basket cases, and everything in between. I've owned somewhere between 50 and 100 cars and trucks with the vast majority of them being GM and the vast majority of those being Chevys, so I am partial to them because of my own experiences. I'm now 75 years old and pretty much reduced to just buying and trading. I don't have the desire (or ability) to work on them much anymore, just prefer to own and drive them one at a time now and also prefer to not keep one too long after the warranty runs out. :laugh:

Fuel mileage is not really an important factor for me but I understand it is for many people. Just as the things that are important to me are not to a lot of people. But that's why we have choices.
Pretty much me too, although it will take me 5-6 years to get to 30,000 on my current truck. The cost of ownership is irrelevant to me. I have my biases relative to brand, but within that context, I select the trucks I buy based mostly on a) how well they do the jobs I need done, b) comfort/amenities/accessories/options and c) cost of ownership. Pretty much in that order.
 

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Our company tracks total operating expense of all vehicles. I didn't post that chart. Considering our company has vehicles that are driven by one person and they use that truck for everything, they take them home, and they are maintained at the mfg. maintenance intervals, most of our GM 1500's are at the bottom of the list due to many of them had a transmission replacement around 100,000 to 120,000 miles. This drives the maintenance cost right up.

The Dodge Rams and the Ford F150's run close concerning maintenance costs except for one of the Dodge Ram 1500's that one of the guys that works for me drives. At 120,000 miles we had to replace the engine. Camshaft failed to the point that two cylinders were dead. That obviously didn't set well with me concerning the Hemi, albeit, it was the only Ram that we have had engine problems with so maybe a fluck, it happens.

Normal maintenance costs, E.g. fluid changes, tires, brakes, etc. are very consistent across the board. Operational costs are driven up when a vehicle needs a transmission, engine or other costly component.

We are sort of a unique company in that we buy the make truck the guy wants so we have a mix of all manufacturers so we really know which make truck costs more to operate over many miles.

We depreciate our pickup trucks over 3 - 5 years, depending on who will be driving it. Some of our drivers drive 50,000 miles per year and some 30,000 per year.

The Ford F150 is generally a more expensive truck to buy, although, at the end of 150,000 miles, it is by a large margin the most economical.

Now if you trade your truck in every 3 years with 30,000 miles on it, then it really doesn't matter what you buy, at least based on cost to you.

Fuel cost is absolutely, by a LARGE margin, the number one expense any vehicle has outside of the initial cost of the vehicle. Let me say that again!! The amount of money you spend on fuel for a vehicle is by a large margin, the largest expense category when it comes to operating a vehicle.

If you run a vehicle 150,000 miles and it averages 20 mpg, your vehicle will use 7500 gallons of fuel. 7500 gallons x $2.75/gallon = $20,625
If you run a vehicle 150,000 miles and it averages 18 mpg, your vehicle will use 8333 gallons of fuel. 8333 gallons x $2.75/gallon = $22,915 or $2290 more.
If you run a vehicle 150,000 miles and it averages 16 mpg, you vehicle will use 9375 gallons of fuel. 9375 gallons x $2.75/gallon = $25,781

As you thought, Fuel mileage is huge and is the largest expense in owning a vehicle, outside of the initial cost.

Of course, everything has limits.

One argument that is made is, especially on heavy duty trucks such as the Ford F250, GM 2500 and Ram 2500 is, buy a diesel because rather than a gasoline engine because it gets better fuel mileage, which is true, but!!!!

If you actually do the math, you will never save enough fuel $$$$$'s to pay for the diesel engine. Diesel engines are about a $9000.00 option when buying a new truck. The cost of diesel fuel per gallons is about .50/gallon higher than gasoline.

The average gas engine in a heavy duty truck will average about 14 mpg. in real usage. Again, at 150,000 miles, gasoline usage will be 10,714 gallons. Based on $2.75/gallon, the gas engine truck will use, $29,463 of gasoline in 150,000 miles.

The average diesel engine in a heavy duty truck will average about 19 mpg. Again, at 150,000 miles, diesel fuel usage will be 7894 gallons. Based on $3.30/gallon, the diesel engine truck will use, $26,050 of diesel fuel in 150,000 miles, a difference of $3413. Still $5600 in the hole with the diesel engine.

So, don't buy a diesel engine in a new truck because you think you are going to save enough in fuel mileage to pay for the engine, you will not. If you want the diesel engine because you just want it or you need the extra torque, then go for it, but know for sure, the diesel engine is not going to save you enough $$$$ to pay for it.

The fuel costs per gallon that I used in this illustration are based on average PA fuel costs. I realize that most states, except NYS, have lower fuel prices than PA. That said, overall fuel cost will go down if the price per gallon is lower, but it goes down for all makes of trucks, so cost per gallon is relative.
Thanks a heap for posting that.

I'm one of the rare few, odd duck again, that keeps a vehicle for a long time. I'm at 159K miles and 13 years on my current ride. 14 years this Nov.

Gas Mileage has always been important to me. I did some mods on my current car that upped my gas mileage about 15%. Cost was very little too. Over the years I'll save a couple of grand more just on gas.

When your keeping a vehicle for a long period of time you really reap a lot of savings. If in my case I borrowed to buy at a typical car payments of 60 months/5 years and 30K initial cost in ten years I'll have paid for my current ride and saved enough for my next ride and every year after is more than 6k in the bank. Hopefully I can make over 15 years of ownership before I have to move on.

I wasn't always of this mind. In my foolish youth I spent lots on cars, wish I was wiser sooner. Many things I'd rather have/do with the money then waste it on a car.
 

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That's all well and good and if I were using a truck to make my living this could be helpful data. But I'm not and never have, you pretty much nailed me in the line I highlighted above. Except I'm a little behind the curve right now with 5 years @ 35000 miles. Just haven't seen anything lately that I like that much better than what I have now, but I will.

I've been buying, selling, trading, repairing/rebuilding vehicles since I was 15 years old. I've had new, used, basket cases, and everything in between. I've owned somewhere between 50 and 100 cars and trucks with the vast majority of them being GM and the vast majority of those being Chevys, so I am partial to them because of my own experiences. I'm now 75 years old and pretty much reduced to just buying and trading. I don't have the desire (or ability) to work on them much anymore, just prefer to own and drive them one at a time now and also prefer to not keep one too long after the warranty runs out. :laugh:

Fuel mileage is not really an important factor for me but I understand it is for many people. Just as the things that are important to me are not to a lot of people. But that's why we have choices.
You are absolutely correct!! We all like what we like.

My point was a reply to another post. We also sometimes try to "justify" what we buy based on some unknown factor such as maintenance costs or fuel mileage and the bottom line is, most of us really do not know what fuel mileage we get or how much it costs to maintain a vehicle.

By all means, buy what you like. I'm not trying to change anyone's mind, just stating some real life facts pertaining to different makes of trucks.
 

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Thanks a heap for posting that.

I'm one of the rare few, odd duck again, that keeps a vehicle for a long time. I'm at 159K miles and 13 years on my current ride. 14 years this Nov.

Gas Mileage has always been important to me. I did some mods on my current car that upped my gas mileage about 15%. Cost was very little too. Over the years I'll save a couple of grand more just on gas.

When your keeping a vehicle for a long period of time you really reap a lot of savings. If in my case I borrowed to buy at a typical car payments of 60 months/5 years and 30K initial cost in ten years I'll have paid for my current ride and saved enough for my next ride and every year after is more than 6k in the bank. Hopefully I can make over 15 years of ownership before I have to move on.

I wasn't always of this mind. In my foolish youth I spent lots on cars, wish I was wiser sooner. Many things I'd rather have/do with the money then waste it on a car.
Yep!!!! A vehicle is a necessary evil that we all need and want but is one of the most expensive purchases that we make that we do over and over again and depreciation is crazy.
 

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Yep!!!! A vehicle is a necessary evil that we all need and want but is one of the most expensive purchases that we make that we do over and over again and depreciation is crazy.
Depreciation is probably the most costly aspect especially when buying new. This is just my opinion - I have not done the math.

My last new truck I bought in 2009 and meant to keep it for 15-20 years. It was kind of my retirement truck and went all out with all the goodies. I knew once I retired I wouldn’t be able to afford it so I bought it before I retired to have it paid for once I retired.

Well that didn’t work out as last spring I found the rear cab corners starting to show some rust. I decided to trade it right then before it got really noticeable. I wanted an aluminum truck to hopefully avoid any of this in the future.

Buying a new truck was out. I ended up buying a really clean 3 year old off-lease Lariat that had all the goodies. Paid pretty close to 1/2 the original sticker price. After 15 months the truck has been rock solid and I love it.

I feel I beat th depreciation curve doing this. To me it’s just like a new truck but didn’t take that huge first 2-3 year depreciation. These trucks really hold their value around here after the 3 year mark.

When it’s time to do it again I will do it exactly the same way - look for a 3 year old off-lease truck.
 

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I think the best innovation regarding pickup tailgates has nothing to do with the actual tailgate, it is the corner step in the bumper. GM used these on the early Avalanches back in 2002, but stopped with 2007. These allowed you to get in the bed of the truck fairly easy.

GM didn't start putting them on regular pickups until 2015 or 2016. My 2016 Silverado has them, and even being a 4x4, I can climb in to the back with ease (bad hips and all) without having to pull out a separate step or push a button. Best of all, they do not get blocked if you have a load of lumber hanging out the back on the tailgate.
 

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Just like the side tool box on the Dodge when it came out. I saw a guy load a quite large 4 wheeler into the back of an Excursion once, and was blown away by the barn door feature swinging way out of the way. Certain things are a great upgrade, but multi tool tailgates are a bit much imo. Like I said before, it’s just a gimmick to get you to buy that truck.
 

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Depreciation is probably the most costly aspect especially when buying new. This is just my opinion - I have not done the math.
Bought my last car with less than 1500 miles and it was about 5 months old.

Talk about depreciation, I saved about 1/3 off the price of new.


Depreciation cost goes down the longer you own a vehicle. Another reason to keep a vehicle long time.

If you buy new every 3 years or so you maybe right.
Altho demand, inflation and or increases in cost of new has prices of new going up so fast that old ones become more valuable.

First year is the biggest drop.
Drop from year 10 to year 11 is very minimal if any.



At a certain point age doesn't matter, it becomes all about condition.

Of course collector/high demand vehicles don't apply.

Keep a car long enough and in very good condition with low usage and will it be worth what you paid for it due to inflation?
 

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Bought my last car with less than 1500 miles and it was about 5 months old.

Talk about depreciation, I saved about 1/3 off the price of new.


Depreciation cost goes down the longer you own a vehicle. Another reason to keep a vehicle long time.

If you buy new every 3 years or so you maybe right.
Altho demand, inflation and or increases in cost of new has prices of new going up so fast that old ones become more valuable.

First year is the biggest drop.
Drop from year 10 to year 11 is very minimal if any.



At a certain point age doesn't matter, it becomes all about condition.

Of course collector/high demand vehicles don't apply.

Keep a car long enough and in very good condition with low usage and will it be worth what you paid for it due to inflation?
All good info, relevant mainly to those who just need a truck and don't care about the options and amenities. If I didn't care about seat heaters, heated steering wheel, steps on the bumper corners, Bluetooth, satellite radio, and Apple CarPlay, then getting a nice functional used pickup to minimize the depreciation hit would definitely be the way to go for some, but not me. GM and the others keep adding those kinds of options and doodads specifically for guys like me they, and the other companies brought out these fancy tailgates just for truck owners like me. I am smack dab in the middle of their target market these days.
 

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Depreciation is probably the most costly aspect especially when buying new. This is just my opinion - I have not done the math.

My last new truck I bought in 2009 and meant to keep it for 15-20 years. It was kind of my retirement truck and went all out with all the goodies. I knew once I retired I wouldn’t be able to afford it so I bought it before I retired to have it paid for once I retired.

Well that didn’t work out as last spring I found the rear cab corners starting to show some rust. I decided to trade it right then before it got really noticeable. I wanted an aluminum truck to hopefully avoid any of this in the future.

Buying a new truck was out. I ended up buying a really clean 3 year old off-lease Lariat that had all the goodies. Paid pretty close to 1/2 the original sticker price. After 15 months the truck has been rock solid and I love it.

I feel I beat th depreciation curve doing this. To me it’s just like a new truck but didn’t take that huge first 2-3 year depreciation. These trucks really hold their value around here after the 3 year mark.

When it’s time to do it again I will do it exactly the same way - look for a 3 year old off-lease truck.
You are absolutely correct. Most people buy a new vehicle because of the ease of getting it. What do I mean by that??? Well, you can walk into a new car dealers showroom and walk out with a brand new vehicle all in the same afternoon, title work done, financing done, etc., etc., etc.

Many of us remember the day when you had to find your own financing, etc. when you bought a new vehicle, not anymore.

With 0% financing, it is much harder to buy a used vehicle unless you are paying cash of course, which is rare in today's world.

Heck, people lease cars now instead of owning???
 

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All good info, relevant mainly to those who just need a truck and don't care about the options and amenities. If I didn't care about seat heaters, heated steering wheel, steps on the bumper corners, Bluetooth, satellite radio, and Apple CarPlay, then getting a nice functional used pickup to minimize the depreciation hit would definitely be the way to go for some, but not me. GM and the others keep adding those kinds of options and doodads specifically for guys like me they, and the other companies brought out these fancy tailgates just for truck owners like me. I am smack dab in the middle of their target market these days.
You and 99% of the buyers out their. That is why they offer all the stuff!!! :good2:
 

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You are absolutely correct. Most people buy a new vehicle because of the ease of getting it. What do I mean by that??? Well, you can walk into a new car dealers showroom and walk out with a brand new vehicle all in the same afternoon, title work done, financing done, etc., etc., etc.

Many of us remember the day when you had to find your own financing, etc. when you bought a new vehicle, not anymore.

With 0% financing, it is much harder to buy a used vehicle unless you are paying cash of course, which is rare in today's world.

Heck, people lease cars now instead of owning???
Before leases were common buying used was often a crap shoot. You always had to wonder if there was a reason the previous owner got rid of the vehicle. I generally bought new just for that reason. These days there are lots of good used 3 and 4 year old vehicles on the market for sale only because the lease was up.
 

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Before leases were common buying used was often a crap shoot. You always had to wonder if there was a reason the previous owner got rid of the vehicle. I generally bought new just for that reason. These days there are lots of good used 3 and 4 year old vehicles on the market for sale only because the lease was up.
That is why I specified an off lease truck when looking used for my present truck. Great success!
 
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