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Discussion Starter #1
Serious question...why are SO MANY sellers completely clueless when pricing their SCUT tractors?

My rule of thumb - price a NEW comparable model and then post a ask price of 50-80%, expecting 10% negotiation.

Seeing more and more of guys asking 95-105% of what dealers are advertising new for on a cash deal. Why?!? I get - you only need 1 sucker...but do you really think your going to fall into finding said sucker without a million time wasters in between?

By time wasters, I mean the completely uneducated who have done ZERO research...and expect you to educate them gratis. Then when you do help them...they know enough to go elsewhere. Or the "I'll give you a quarter on the dollar of ask price - cause your overpriced" jackass...just because I ask 25% too much doesnt mean I should take 75% less...although these 2 seemingly deserve each other.

I get there is no "model year" depreciation...and low hour machines are more valuable. But smaller tractors tend to be more plentiful with lower hours...and new is always better than used in general, even well maintained used.

Also, these are non emission units. No difference in new gaving unwanted tech...again, I get how bigger units command a premium - but on SCUT thats not the case.

Finally, the - "I paid xxx" guy...so what? You paid x - I dont care if you under/overpaid...only what your competition is selling for. Had a guy tell me - "well with tax...Im cheaper" - he was asking exactly what dealer would sell me a new unit delivered for...his was 5 years old with 200 hours. Reminded him that all I needed to do to avoid tax was hand dealer an ag exemption form - which takes all of 3 minutes to fill out and the dealer keeps a stack of on the sales desk. Got all huffy with me...telling me why his is still better. Just left him my price and number, said you got a week till I need it...so if you can meet me, I'll do it. 3 weeks later - guess whose calling.
 

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Serious question...why are SO MANY sellers completely clueless when pricing their SCUT tractors?

My rule of thumb - price a NEW comparable model and then post a ask price of 50-80%, expecting 10% negotiation.

Seeing more and more of guys asking 95-105% of what dealers are advertising new for on a cash deal. Why?!? I get - you only need 1 sucker...but do you really think your going to fall into finding said sucker without a million time wasters in between?

By time wasters, I mean the completely uneducated who have done ZERO research...and expect you to educate them gratis. Then when you do help them...they know enough to go elsewhere. Or the "I'll give you a quarter on the dollar of ask price - cause your overpriced" jackass...just because I ask 25% too much doesnt mean I should take 75% less...although these 2 seemingly deserve each other.

I get there is no "model year" depreciation...and low hour machines are more valuable. But smaller tractors tend to be more plentiful with lower hours...and new is always better than used in general, even well maintained used.

Also, these are non emission units. No difference in new gaving unwanted tech...again, I get how bigger units command a premium - but on SCUT thats not the case.

Finally, the - "I paid xxx" guy...so what? You paid x - I dont care if you under/overpaid...only what your competition is selling for. Had a guy tell me - "well with tax...Im cheaper" - he was asking exactly what dealer would sell me a new unit delivered for...his was 5 years old with 200 hours. Reminded him that all I needed to do to avoid tax was hand dealer an ag exemption form - which takes all of 3 minutes to fill out and the dealer keeps a stack of on the sales desk. Got all huffy with me...telling me why his is still better. Just left him my price and number, said you got a week till I need it...so if you can meet me, I'll do it. 3 weeks later - guess whose calling.
Are you in Maine? We seem to have the market cornered on crackhead sellers. I want more then I paid 4 years ago, and you get no warranty and no financing.
 

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When I bought my 1026r I started out looking for a used machine. New turned out to be a better option as you got a new tractor , low interest rate, warranty At not much more cost than a used tractor.

why people think their used tractor is worth as much or more as new is beyond me.
 

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Sales tax is a legitimate cost of the sale, unless you truly qualify for an exemption as provided by your state's laws. I would be surprised if a dealer was encouraging or suggesting a fraudulent exemption. Exemptions are far and few between where I live and they aggressively enforce the sales tax laws.

It is also rather surprising how fast the little things add up on a tractor. I keep pretty good records as a result of being business owner for 30+ years and realizing how fast those little things add up to a sizeable deduction. I carried the same bookkeeping through on my personal items. I decided to offer the second 1025R we had from our second home, which we sold two years ago. I pulled my cost tally for it from my bookkeeping system. I have just shy of $30,000.00 into it. It is a 1025R, w/ FEL, 54D mower deck, 47 snowblower, cab, suitcase weights, and Heavy Hitch weight rack/receiver. I also performed all the setup myself to avoid the far too common dealer setup issues and having to fix the mess they made of it. The installation and setup charges would easily tally up to be several thousand dollars at the dealer.

If you were to price a new machine on John Deere's Build Your Own web page, I'd be surprised if the total would top $25K---it didn't when I priced this machine out. The difference is all those little things really start to add up.

The 0% financing is not free--nothing ever is. The financing is built into the price of the machine, when you finance. When I purchased my first 1025R, I utilized JD's 0% financing. When I purchased the second, I paid cash. The second was a fair amount less due to the fact I was paying cash.

We decided to sell the second 1025R and have it advertised locally. It has 30 hours on it and includes all the items I mentioned and the "little things" I spoke of. we're asking $27K for the package. Considering what I paid for it and my setup/installation services, I conservatively arrived at that price being $5K less than what I have into it. Granted, that is no where near what the OP perceives where it should be priced, but by the time he purchases a new unit and equips it the same, he'll be $5K north of it and potentially still have some dealer issues to contend with. Likewise, he can maybe find a used unit he can purchase for 50% less of new. All I can say to that is when it is too good to be true, it is.

So why there is, no doubt, folks who want to sell an item that has been rode hard and hung up wet for near the price of new, there are those of us who believe $5K is plenty of depreciation for a tractor with 30 hours on the meter and setup/cared for by a competent perfectionist.
 

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Serious question...why are SO MANY sellers completely clueless when pricing their SCUT tractors?

My rule of thumb - price a NEW comparable model and then post a ask price of 50-80%, expecting 10% negotiation.
.....

Just left him my price and number, said you got a week till I need it...so if you can meet me, I'll do it. 3 weeks later - guess whose calling.
I’ve never sold a tractor, but I just let the market decide what it’s worth. My rule of thumb for selling other types of big rolling stock is to check local selling sites where I’ll be listing, like Craigslist, or more likely Facebook marketplace, and see what the going price. After comparing features, age, and condition of the competing vehicles, that’s my selling price. I feel no obligation to be “fair”, only honest and forthright. If nobody bites, I drop the price and re-list. I’ve had those “here’s-my-price-take-it-or-leave-it” calls and I appreciate them because they help me define the market, but more often than not it’s a lowball offer and I just ignore them. They’re often the ones that call or email back three weeks later to increase their offer...after it’s sold.
 

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Then there are times where someone else might be pushing the sale. The CFO might say I need to sell this thing and I can post it on Craigslist for $10K over what it is probably worth. Everyone is happy. CFO sees it for sale, I get to keep using it since it hasn't sold. ;)

The way I look at it, everything is for sale. There is very little that I own that I wouldn't let go for the right price.
 

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Adding to what you said - when selling a slightly used 1 or 2 year old tractor you are then competing with Deere’s 0% financing. Not too many people will buy a used tractor for cash when they can get a new one with that financing.

But to my point - who cares if people list used tractors for too much money? If you don’t think the price is fair, move on.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Let me add a few things.

1. 50-80% # I use is for used...used as in used more than a day. Of course a machine with less than 50 hours use and looking new will command more. At minimum I would say 85% - 90 isnt unreasonable.

2. Just because you have implements, doesnt mean the next buyer needs/wants them. Again, implements are expensive...but depending on who/where you are...certain things just dont hold value well. Brooms/snow equipment immediately comes to mind...pricey, but not something all buyers need. Loader - yep, that adds value easily.

3. I know of no dealer FRAUDULANTLY giving sales tax breaks. I know of several who know the law and make you aware of it if its to your benefit.

4. Who cares if sellers overprice...I really dont, BUT it makes the pricing by what others are asking damn near impossible. Its a free market...but just tiring to see suckers looking for bigger suckers.

5. As always - there are exceptions. Exceptionally clean or exceptionally hard to obtain units will command a premium. I get that and if you got something special - you can ask and expect higher prices.

6. Financing aint free...but its not always expensive either. Clearly dealers make their markup on implements/add ons on the sale - using 0% finance as a lure. If you buy just base units on financing and then source some used implements for cash...in general you will be further ahead of the game come resale time. Just like autos...its those "upgrades" that line the maker pockets.
 

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I've been on the buyer side where I thought a machine was slightly overpriced for me. It might have been fairly priced but was more than I could justify for my use. In those cases, I just tell the seller that here's all I can do. I'm not arguing about your price- it may be fair and if you can't take my price that's fine. I appreciate you showing it to me and good luck with it.

Some times I've bought, more times I haven't but I'm not playing a game. I give them a price that is worth what the machine/toy whatever is worth to me. The good news is that if I do buy something, I usually don't have buyer's remorse.

Treefarmer
 

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As a buyer of a used 1026R (still from a JD dealership) I found it difficult initially to realise what difference I was getting versus a new machine that was on 0% finance. The calculations showed that it would have been cheaper as a total cost. I flipped my lid after coming home from a long day, 2 days after buying my tractor and seeing a 1025R full page advert with the same attachments for a lot less and with a 5 year warranty. As a newbie I don't know all the differences between each model and to be fair I still don't, even though I asked what was going on. It's been sorted now but I will always feel a bit let down as I was told this is the best deal and i thought I could actually trust the guy. If you're in the business then you know these things but I'm not. This is my first lifestyle block and as such I still feel as though I was one of those suckers. But I also know I'll get over it and to be fair I love the tractor and how useful it is. I can't wait to add more attachments and really do some things.
 

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While I realize everyone the goes into a dealership to by a car or tractor ends up paying a some what different price. when I bought my 1026R the out the door price was the same for the 0% interest or cash price. I had the money in my checking account for the tractor. OfferEd to pay cash , dealer wouldn’t give me a discount for paying cash. Was told the cost of financing was built in to all sales. But , the one series was just coming out and were hard to find at the time.
 

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As a buyer of a used 1026R (still from a JD dealership) I found it difficult initially to realise what difference I was getting versus a new machine that was on 0% finance. The calculations showed that it would have been cheaper as a total cost. I flipped my lid after coming home from a long day, 2 days after buying my tractor and seeing a 1025R full page advert with the same attachments for a lot less and with a 5 year warranty. As a newbie I don't know all the differences between each model and to be fair I still don't, even though I asked what was going on. It's been sorted now but I will always feel a bit let down as I was told this is the best deal and i thought I could actually trust the guy. If you're in the business then you know these things but I'm not. This is my first lifestyle block and as such I still feel as though I was one of those suckers. But I also know I'll get over it and to be fair I love the tractor and how useful it is. I can't wait to add more attachments and really do some things.
From what I've deduced, the 1026R was initially marketed as a global tractor model. At some point, JD decided to create the 1025R for the North American market and it was paired down in areas to reduce the cost. This has been a somewhat historical business model for JD. I don't know if it is because European tractor buyers are more discerning than us North American hillbillies and jack pine savages, competitive issues, or profitability. While I've never had the inclination to sit down and analyze all the differences between a 1026R and a 1025R, I can tell you that the electrical system of a 1026R supports a number of optional items that the 1025R does not. I believe JD still markets the 1026R in Europe, verses the 1025R, and that would also cause me to speculate there are more, significant, differences between the two.

So, you probably got more tractor with your used 1026R than a new 1025R.
 

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From what I've deduced, the 1026R was initially marketed as a global tractor model. At some point, JD decided to create the 1025R for the North American market and it was paired down in areas to reduce the cost. This has been a somewhat historical business model for JD. I don't know if it is because European tractor buyers are more discerning than us North American hillbillies and jack pine savages, competitive issues, or profitability. While I've never had the inclination to sit down and analyze all the differences between a 1026R and a 1025R, I can tell you that the electrical system of a 1026R supports a number of optional items that the 1025R does not. I believe JD still markets the 1026R in Europe, verses the 1025R, and that would also cause me to speculate there are more, significant, differences between the two.

So, you probably got more tractor with your used 1026R than a new 1025R.
That's my understanding too. I know I have a better tractor and I think the engine is just slightly bigger too it was just hard to figure that all out and determine if it was value for money.
 

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That's my understanding too. I know I have a better tractor and I think the engine is just slightly bigger too it was just hard to figure that all out and determine if it was value for money.
I wouldn't beat yourself up over it. We all have items that we paid too much for---and I'm not really certain you paid too much.

I remember back when I had my first 455. It didn't have a cab and there were days it was just plain miserable to blow snow with it. The 4X5s ad been discontinued by then and no one was offering a cab for one, either. One day, I was browsing ebay and yo and behold, there was a John Deere (Femco) hardside cab not 16 miles from my home with an opening bid of $750. I reached out to the seller and later connected via phone. I inquired what it would take for him to withdraw the listing and sell it to me direct. He replied. "You know those cabs will go $1000.00." I responded, "I'll give you $1200.00 if we can do the deal tonight." Needless to say, I bought the cab and paid the $1200.00. I probably paid $200 more than he would have sold it for, but I wanted it and didn't want to take a chance on missing the purchase.

I'll never blow snow again without a cab. It is kind of like having a home with central A/C, once you have it, you'll never be without it.
 

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My rule of thumb for selling other types of big rolling stock is to check local selling sites where I’ll be listing, like Craigslist, or more likely Facebook marketplace, and see what the going price.
What you see is the price that people are asking. They may or may not be getting that price. Buyers may not be paying that much...
 

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What you see is the price that people are asking. They may or may not be getting that price. Buyers may not be paying that much...
Of course. But gotta start somewhere...might as well start where everyone else is starting and we'll all negotiate from there, with the final selling price based on what the market will bear, and how bad and how quickly we all want to sell the thing.
 

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Of course. But gotta start somewhere...might as well start where everyone else is starting and we'll all negotiate from there, with the final selling price based on what the market will bear, and how bad and how quickly we all want to sell the thing.
In the well used market that I flip in all you see is crackhead prices. The properly priced items sell fast enough that they don’t build up and overwhelm the currently available listings. eBay is a great example. It allows you to look at sold items to see what actual selling prices are. There can be a pretty big delta between what’s available and what’s still for sale.
 

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In the well used market that I flip in all you see is crackhead prices. The properly priced items sell fast enough that they don’t build up and overwhelm the currently available listings. eBay is a great example. It allows you to look at sold items to see what actual selling prices are. There can be a pretty big delta between what’s available and what’s still for sale.
I don't know about any of that. I change my asking price only if I need to. I consider all offers. When someone lowballs me, I tell them I'll take their number and call them if nothing better comes up, but it always does and I usually don't. More often, I just relist it at a lower price.
 

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What the OP is seeing is probably seller's starting out high. When I sold my boat I started 6k higher than what I expected to get. The guy that ultimately bought it left with it at 15k. I started at 20k. Let him "talk me down" to 15k.

He left thinking he was one heck of a negotiater, and I sold it for 1k more than I expected. We both won.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Big,

Thats part of it....but really some sellers are just expecting way too much.

Using your example...list an item worth 16k for 20k. (lets assume for sake of argument a dealer would expect 16k for your boat...so being a private seller without overhead, you would accept 15k).

To me - what you have done is turned off many potential buyers. I know places who would offer said boat for 17,000 - expecting some negotiation down to 16k flat. I see a seller asking 15% above normal ask...I either go to the next seller (the guy asking 17) or if I am really interested - might put a feeler in on the price, letting your response determine if I make any offer.

Ultimately, sales is a numbers game. You got 1 item to sell...so you dont need 100 buyers, just 1 who will pay your price. BUT it is easier to have 100 potential buyers competing against each other than 20 because you scared off 80 others with a big price tag.

Honestly, good on you - getting 16 when you expected 15...but who knows, if you had said 17 from the start...it might have sold faster or for more (possibly a buyer comes along ask you if you have any flexibility in the price...you say a little, but Ive got several inquiries....so they offer 16500).

Negotiation is expected on private party sales..depending on the price/item, 5-25% - just depends on price and item. Waverunners in winter are hard to sell for example...tractors in spring much easier...just as newer/cleaner tends to be easier than older/well used. The key though in my sales experience (professional and personal) - price an item at the point that maximizes both exposure and price. Too cheap - you'll be overrun with inquiries..too cheap, you get lowballers and frustration. The less room between your "take" and your ask...the happier you are with the process...at least in my experience.
 
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