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Discussion Starter #1
WRT others who have been unfortunate with rear wheel incidents- I feel for ya, brother.

So, last summer I ripped out a rear tire valve stem on a fluid filled rear tire. Not that big of a deal to get it fixed, but wrestling it back on was a serious PITA.

I noticed that the procedure was to thread a bolt through the wheel into the flange. Not so easy to do...

I think it would be easier to put the wheel on a stud!

So why don't I put the bolt through the wheel flange, put the tire on and then use some nylock nuts on the wheel stud/bolts?

I think I could do it one bolt at a time and not have to take the wheel off. What size nylock nuts do I need?

1025 TLB.
 

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Maybe better yet get 2 bolts same size and thread as the wheel lug bolts. Cut the heads off, screw those into the axle flange. Slide the wheel on over the 2 now studs. Then you could screw the 3 lug bolts on. Remove the 2 studs, put them in your tool box for future use, and screw in the other 2 lug bolts? Don't forget to torque them for sure.:thumbup1gif::greentractorride::usa
 

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Maybe better yet get 2 bolts same size and thread as the wheel lug bolts. Cut the heads off, screw those into the axle flange. Slide the wheel on over the 2 now studs. Then you could screw the 3 lug bolts on. Remove the 2 studs, put them in your tool box for future use, and screw in the other 2 lug bolts? Don't forget to torque them for sure.:thumbup1gif::greentractorride::usa
What he said^^^^^^, or why not just wrestle them, it's not like we take off and on often.
 

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WRT others who have been unfortunate with rear wheel incidents- I feel for ya, brother.

So, last summer I ripped out a rear tire valve stem on a fluid filled rear tire. Not that big of a deal to get it fixed, but wrestling it back on was a serious PITA.

I noticed that the procedure was to thread a bolt through the wheel into the flange. Not so easy to do...

I think it would be easier to put the wheel on a stud!
It's much simpler just to buy a longer bolt at the hardware store, cut off the head, grind two flat spots and use it as a guide pin. The one shown below is for the front wheel but I also made one for the rear wheel.

Spacer2.jpg
 

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WRT others who have been unfortunate with rear wheel incidents- I feel for ya, brother.

So, last summer I ripped out a rear tire valve stem on a fluid filled rear tire. Not that big of a deal to get it fixed, but wrestling it back on was a serious PITA.

I noticed that the procedure was to thread a bolt through the wheel into the flange. Not so easy to do...

I think it would be easier to put the wheel on a stud!

So why don't I put the bolt through the wheel flange, put the tire on and then use some nylock nuts on the wheel stud/bolts?

I think I could do it one bolt at a time and not have to take the wheel off. What size nylock nuts do I need?

1025 TLB.
I'm sure there is a reason why JD chose to use wheel bolts instead of stud/nut combination.
 

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Thank you jgayman for the size.

But, why buy a bolt when you can buy a TOOL! Not an easy size to find, quick search found this:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Car-Alloy-Wheel-Bolt-Stud-Alignment-Align-Tool-M12-x-1-25/231410251994?hash=item35e12038da:g:VtQAAOSwBv9Z3eQs

Kevin
$19 and waiting for it to ship from the UK? Seriously, for all the often you typically need to take a wheel off and on the bolt works like a charm. After all, a bolt has more than enough hardness.
 
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Bolts being used is nothing new by any means. We used to wrestle the duals on and off of 1066 IH's that are mid 70's machines a few times a year mounted up to the hub with bolts. Every tractor on the farm had bolts except for the Massey Ferguson 135, it had lug nuts. It's the only tractor I have ever had any dealings with that had studs and lug nuts. The 135 was the only tractor on the farm with spin out wheels so I don't know if that had anything to do with it having wheels studs or not. I have no clue for the reasoning behind bolts or studs but perhaps manufactures still use bolts simply because that's just the way they have always done it.
 

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Lisle 13970

For a tool, search Lisle 13970 on Amazon. It's a set of two wheel mounting pilot studs, 12mm-1.25 pitch for under $20
 

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I have guide studs that I made from long bolts. Easy and cheap. Saves ya from having a loaded tire slip off a narrow axle flange and get ya.
No idea why Deere loves bolts vs studs. Its not the end of the world.. Just adapt and over come.

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Just get some longer bolts and some lug nuts. I wouldn't even worry about a guide, for as often as you would change the wheel just slide it onto the bolts (studs).
 

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Discussion Starter #15
OK guys, thanks for all the input. :bigthumb:

Not sure how I'm gonna handle this but I have some ideas.

Supposed to be warmer but rainy all weekend so I might hang out in the garage and come up with something, but I have "indoor" things to finish up as winter projects.
 
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Guide pins are the best solution. However you can do it with no special tools by simply jacking the tractor to align the height of the axle to the same height as a rolling wheel and then simply jockey the wheel into place.. It's really not that difficult.

Good Luck

Sincerely
 

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Guide pins are the best solution. However you can do it with no special tools by simply jacking the tractor to align the height of the axle to the same height as a rolling wheel and then simply jockey the wheel into place.. It's really not that difficult.
Absolutely correct! And that is exactly what most of us did the FIRST time we removed our wheels. It is especially fun with loaded wheels. It also involved the use of a few choice words followed by "I'll never do that again without guide pins". :laugh:
 

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Guide pins are the best solution. However you can do it with no special tools by simply jacking the tractor to align the height of the axle to the same height as a rolling wheel and then simply jockey the wheel into place.. It's really not that difficult.

Good Luck

Sincerely
Exactly what he said ^^^^.

It's not complicated. With the tractor at the proper height I can roll the tire around to get it where I need it. On those rare occasions things aren't going quick enough or easy enough, a pry bar can be used to scoot the tire in towards the hub and prevents additional rolling around or heavy lifting. The only time I have seen getting a loaded tire onto a tractor become very difficult was from someone who took the tire off and allowed it to get onto the ground and needed assistance to stand it upright again.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Guide pins are the best solution. However you can do it with no special tools by simply jacking the tractor to align the height of the axle to the same height as a rolling wheel and then simply jockey the wheel into place.. It's really not that difficult.

Good Luck

Sincerely

To make things clearer for all, that's exactly what I did. But the with the bottle jack I was using, the wheel flange was not quite vertical, and the tire wanted to roll around on the 2x4 stack I made. I was using a small tire iron to get the last fractional inches up/down. Eventually I got things lined up, but I was kinda worried about the bolt threads getting chewed up as they stated to turn down into the bores. Good grief, how do big tractors in the field get their tires fixed?
 
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1025R front/rear is:

Thread Size12.000 MM
Thread Pitch1.250 MM

The Gorilla set doesn't include this size. You can buy a bolt for around $2.00.
Perhaps you know, is this the same size as the 2038R. I can find that easy enough but what I am really wondering is what is the taper of the bolt head. I think I am going to change 3 of the bolts to studs on each tire to make switching from R3's to R1's easier. I had measured them but I don't remember if they were 12,14 or 16mm but I need the taper angle to buy the correct lug nuts. Usually they are a 80 or 90 degree but I would like to make sure.


Perhaps this was answered from the original post but I don't think I saw it. "So why don't I put the bolt through the wheel flange, put the tire on and then use some nylock nuts on the wheel stud/bolts?"

No good. The flanges is I am guessing 1/2" thick. IMO You will not have enough threads left to safely get the nut to not strip it. If you do the bolt has a taper but the back of the flange is not machined so the bolt will not seat properly and will probably tear up the flange threads.
 
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