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It was about 30 out today, not the coldest its seen by any means. Was using the loader moving some frozen mud out of the driveway. Quit for a couple of hours, and let it sit outside. It is usually in a cold concrete garage, not heated by anything but geothermal I guess.

Plenty of fluid, probably too much in it.

Got on it, and in 2wd, tractor would not pull very hard. Put it in 4wd, and the front would drag it along well enough, I used it like that for about 15 minutes.

Diff lock would not engage or work at all. I thought it was just cold or something.

But even after using it, it never would pull in 2wd well. Put it in high, it would go pretty well, but really just had no torque.


Has 300 hours on the clock.

Any ideas?


I have never checked the screen or changed the hydro oil.............
 

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Are your tires filled with Rim Guard by chance? If so have you checked the tire pressure recently?

I ask becasue there have been a few instances where the rims are slipping inside the tires, and the common factor seems to be Rim Guard (beet juice), low pressure, and cold.
 

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Chalk or otherwise mark the rims/tires...and check your air pressure.
 

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Kenny's right. This has happened several times here on the forum. Every time it was with low tire pressure and in the cold.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This is all VERY good news to me!


Thanks! Never thought to look at the rims. Was pulling it pretty hard with the grader box and loader on frozen mud. Dont usually run it in the cold much.



Hope this slippage isnt something I will deal with when it warms up??? Anyway, glad its not something more serious.
 

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This is all VERY good news to me!
Thanks! Never thought to look at the rims. Was pulling it pretty hard with the grader box and loader on frozen mud. Dont usually run it in the cold much.
Hope this slippage isnt something I will deal with when it warms up??? Anyway, glad its not something more serious.
Add some air pressure.
 

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In the tire business we call this "rim slip." It's a common occurrence on high-performance vehicles and police cars where a heavy foot is prevalent. Tractor tires that usually run low inflation pressures are exacerbated by the lubrication provided by liquid ballast and low speed, high torque conditions such as pushing or pulling a load.

In the automobile industry we frequently saw certain vehicles or drivers complaining of tire vibration, especially after mounting new tires and using bead lubricant. The tire and wheel assembly was balanced but the tire slipped on the wheel after the fact. The balance correction weights became "out of phase" with the original tire imbalance.

As Kenny mentioned, we got into the habit of marking the back side of the tire at the bead and the wheel to monitor the rim slip condition. :good2:
 

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In the tire business we call this "rim slip." It's a common occurrence on high-performance vehicles and police cars where a heavy foot is prevalent. Tractor tires that usually run low inflation pressures are exacerbated by the lubrication provided by liquid ballast and low speed, high torque conditions such as pushing or pulling a load.

In the automobile industry we frequently saw certain vehicles or drivers complaining of tire vibration, especially after mounting new tires and using bead lubricant. The tire and wheel assembly was balanced but the tire slipped on the wheel after the fact. The balance correction weights became "out of phase" with the original tire imbalance.

As Kenny mentioned, we got into the habit of marking the back side of the tire at the bead and the wheel to monitor the rim slip condition.
:good2:
Now that is why I like this place, never once thought of that possibility. :good2::good2:
 

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u say u have 300 hrs on it? and u have never changed the oil ----did u buy it new? after checking for rim slip, i think i would change the hyd. oil too. if ur the one owner, or not-i would drain it, and clean the screen and magnuts too. if never done its way overdue for clean oil then. IMO.:unknown:
 

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Now that is why I like this place, never once thought of that possibility. :good2::good2:
You guys in a perpetually warm climate won’t see stuff like this. Cold weather naturally means your tires loose air pressure.

With my truck I can count in loosing around 4# between summer and winter.

In a situation like this - if the tire pressure on the tractor is low to begin with - let’s say 10#-12# - when it gets cold enough the pressure could drop to 5#-6#. That is low enough for the bead to let loose and let the rims spin in the tires.

This is why when I install my chains each fall I bump the rear tires up to 20#. I typically run them at 10#-12# in the summer for a better ride mowing. I don’t want to take the chance of something like this happening in the winter so I bump the pressures up.
 

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If it isn't the low tire pressure slippage thing then could the parking brake have been on? I've accidentally driven with the brake on for a short bit and it acted somewhat like what you say...

Rob
 

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With my truck I can count in loosing around 4# between summer and winter.
It is amazing how much pressure you can lose on a truck/SUV tire. I always try to adjust my vehicle tires in the dead of winter and middle of summer. I guess that's why some tire shops are offering to fill with Nitrogen to negate the effects of temperature change.

This is why when I install my chains each fall I bump the rear tires up to 20#. I typically run them at 10#-12# in the summer for a better ride mowing. I don’t want to take the chance of something like this happening in the winter so I bump the pressures up.
I run mine around 12# or so as well but I never thought about bumping them up in the winter. They are filled with washer fluid. I think one of my tires may be a couple pounds different as I notice my loader bucket is about 1/2" off and it used to be level. As soon as temperatures get to where I have feeling in my fingers without gloves I will check the pressure.
 

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It is amazing how much pressure you can lose on a truck/SUV tire. I always try to adjust my vehicle tires in the dead of winter and middle of summer. I guess that's why some tire shops are offering to fill with Nitrogen to negate the effects of temperature change.



I run mine around 12# or so as well but I never thought about bumping them up in the winter. They are filled with washer fluid. I think one of my tires may be a couple pounds different as I notice my loader bucket is about 1/2" off and it used to be level. As soon as temperatures get to where I have feeling in my fingers without gloves I will check the pressure.
My tires are loaded with washer fluid also.

I’m not concerned with the ride during winter but in the summer mowing the difference in ride is huge between 25# and 12#. That and a suspension seat it is tolerable now anyway....

And one other thing - I thought the R4’s tires were too stiff to make a difference, but...when I put my chains on with the 12# in the tires then bump them up to 20# the chains really tighten up nicely.
 

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Jeffery was low tire pressure the problem?
 

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My tires are loaded with washer fluid also.

I’m not concerned with the ride during winter but in the summer mowing the difference in ride is huge between 25# and 12#. That and a suspension seat it is tolerable now anyway....
I figured the lower pressure in the winter would allow the tire to squat and create a bigger contact patch and more chain contact.

And one other thing - I thought the R4’s tires were too stiff to make a difference, but...when I put my chains on with the 12# in the tires then bump them up to 20# the chains really tighten up nicely.
I thought that too but looking carefully back along each side of the tractor I can see that one tire is bulged out more - ever so slightly. That's why I think the pressure might be a tad low.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Jeffery was low tire pressure the problem?



Oh yeah, went out today and there was a nice drip on the rim. I only had about 5lbs in them last summer, havent added any since so I'm sure that was the issue.


Moved it to a heated garage to sit in, probably add a few lbs tomorrow.



Thanks everyone for the tip!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
u say u have 300 hrs on it? and u have never changed the oil ----did u buy it new? after checking for rim slip, i think i would change the hyd. oil too. if ur the one owner, or not-i would drain it, and clean the screen and magnuts too. if never done its way overdue for clean oil then. IMO.:unknown:



You were exactly right, I drained and pulled today. Those magnets were full of crap. Fluid looked clean coming out.

I dont have a filter kit yet, or the o-ring, so it will sit another day and drain.

Thanks for the tip.
 
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