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Discussion Starter #1
I've been stopping by at various tractor dealerships to see what they have available (planning for the future), and outside of Kubota, what I immediately noticed is how much larger the rear wheels/tires seem to be on brands like Massey, TYM/RK and New Holland. Their lots seem to go from subcompacts with the ubiquitous lawn/garden sized wheels/tires, to tractors whose rear tires go up to my sternum (so about 50"). To get wheels/tires that big, you have to go to a 4 or 5 series Deere, but these machines are more comparable to 3 or even large frame 2 in terms of price, HP, lift capacity and other features.

Anyone know why this is?
 

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As for the 1-series - they are marketed to mostly home owners and small property owners. These people mostly are coming from lawn tractors. So as not to make these tractors intimidating to them they keep the tires small to make it look not so much as a real tractor.
 

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New Hollands small Workmaster SCUT has tires pretty much the same size as the 1-series.



Massey's SCUT has about the same size tires as well.



Same with TYM

 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, I know SCUTs do, which is why I called their tire size ubiquitous. But, interestingly enough, TYM/RK/Mahindra have two SCUT sizes, the larger of which has 29" tires.

As for the rest, is it really just as simple as big tires sell? Does that mean that JD will start putting larger tires on their CUTs as the others eat away at their market share? Because they haven't yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
As for the 1-series - they are marketed to mostly home owners and small property owners. These people mostly are coming from lawn tractors. So as not to make these tractors intimidating to them they keep the tires small to make it look not so much as a real tractor.
That annoyed me greatly when I realized it. The one thing I didn't like about that tractor was put there to manipulate people into buying it and for no other reason. I hate it.

In fact, that is why I am asking this question. Do JD and Kubota put 36"/37" tires on the 2 and B series tractors for the same reason? "See it's not THAT big, don't be scared!" Because the large frame 2 is heavier than the 3E series and is only "smaller" because of its tire size.
 

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That annoyed me greatly when I realized it. The one thing I didn't like about that tractor was put there to manipulate people into buying it and for no other reason. I hate it.

In fact, that is why I am asking this question. Do JD and Kubota put 36"/37" tires on the 2 and B series tractors for the same reason? "See it's not THAT big, don't be scared!" Because the large frame 2 is heavier than the 3E series and is only "smaller" because of its tire size.
Ha! isn't that marketing 101?:gizmo:

The 1 series filled a big hole. It put a great little general purpose machine into peoples hands that the 2305 just couldn't quite fill. I would have bought a 1 series for sure 13 years ago when I bought my x748--if they would have been invented.

Smaller front tires equate to a tighter turn radius. which is handy for SCUTs and CUTs. I'm with jgayman though, I'm not noticing much difference across the brands.

When you start getting into the 5 series, load capacity starts to become more important than a tight turn radius.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Ha! isn't that marketing 101?:gizmo:

The 1 series filled a big hole. It put a great little general purpose machine into peoples hands that the 2305 just couldn't quite fill. I would have bought a 1 series for sure 13 years ago when I bought my x748--if they would have been invented.

Smaller front tires equate to a tighter turn radius. which is handy for SCUTs and CUTs. I'm with jgayman though, I'm not noticing much difference across the brands.

When you start getting into the 5 series, load capacity starts to become more important than a tight turn radius.

The 2025R (new one, and maybe older one too) has almost the same turning radius as the 1025R. Like, a couple of inches apart (I measured it in the same patch of dirt). Outside of bragging rights, there is no practical way (as in real world utility) in which that can make a difference unless you are turning your tractor around in such a tight space that 1-3" is going to get you hung up. But that has 31" tires. You can actually fit 28" or maybe even 29" tires into the 1 series without modification. TYM/RK/Mahindra have a SCUT with 29" tires.

As for seeing difference across the brands, I specifically said I was not discussing SCUTs. Outside of SCUTs Massey, New Holland and a few other brands' 3R series competitor sits on significantly larger tires. I can't find the specs online, but in person they appeared to be about 50" compared to the Deere's 43".
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm beginning to wonder why you chose green to begin with. :munch:
Because the overall level of quality and ergonomics is superior to the competition. But that doesn't make Deere perfect. It just means they do more things right than the other guys.
 

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The 2025R (new one, and maybe older one too) has almost the same turning radius as the 1025R. Like, a couple of inches apart (I measured it in the same patch of dirt). Outside of bragging rights, there is no practical way (as in real world utility) in which that can make a difference unless you are turning your tractor around in such a tight space that 1-3" is going to get you hung up. But that has 31" tires. You can actually fit 28" or maybe even 29" tires into the 1 series without modification. TYM/RK/Mahindra have a SCUT with 29" tires.

As for seeing difference across the brands, I specifically said I was not discussing SCUTs. Outside of SCUTs Massey, New Holland and a few other brands' 3R series competitor sits on significantly larger tires. I can't find the specs online, but in person they appeared to be about 50" compared to the Deere's 43".
2025R(Gen II) has a a 15inch bigger turn radius than the 1025R.

The 2025R(Gen II) has a 8.7 ft turn radius

The 1025R has a 7.4 Ft turn radius

The Bigger 2R have a 9.4ft turn radius same for the 3E series the 3R has a 8.8 ft turn radius with Brakes applied Older 2025R(Gen I) Had a 6.7FT turn radius

The Older 2032r has a 7.5FT turn radius surprisingly the Older 2025R & 2032R had a Better turn radius

Somebody is suffering from tire envy :laugh:

:bigthumb:
 

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That annoyed me greatly when I realized it. The one thing I didn't like about that tractor was put there to manipulate people into buying it and for no other reason. I hate it.

In fact, that is why I am asking this question. Do JD and Kubota put 36"/37" tires on the 2 and B series tractors for the same reason? "See it's not THAT big, don't be scared!" Because the large frame 2 is heavier than the 3E series and is only "smaller" because of its tire size.
Nothing to be annoyed about. Every where you look or go marketing is at work.

Take a grocery store for example - why do you think you are fed through the produce section when you enter the store? Because those are their highest profit items. And beyond that every single item of the tens of thousands of items on the shelves are positioned where they are for a reason. The items at eye level are either their highest profit items or the manufacturers are actually paying the store for their best shelf positions.

Any store that sells clothes like Walmart - what is in your face when you walk in the door? Clothes. Same goes for Tractor Supply - the clothes are up front right where you walk in.

Back to the Deere dealer. One who is in a suburban area is of course going to have the one series up front and in your face. Do you think the dealer is just randomly parking tractors on their lot? Not by a long shot - every tractor is in a certain position for a reason.
 

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I can't find the specs online, but in person they appeared to be about 50" compared to the Deere's 43".
The reason you can't find specs is tractor tires are spec'd by wheel size. From there you have to determine tire size and find overall diameter.

My 2030 has 16.9 x 28" rears. I can't tell you the height without looking it up.
 

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The reason you can't find specs is tractor tires are spec'd by wheel size. From there you have to determine tire size and find overall diameter.

My 2030 has 16.9 x 28" rears. I can't tell you the height without looking it up.
True.. but Deere and Kubota are very good at putting all of those specs on their website. In addition, they make the owner's manuals readily available on-line which lists all the available tire sizes - as does the Build Your Own guide.

Most other tractor manufacturers like New Holland, TYM, Kioti, Mahindra, Branson, etc. put very minimal information on their websites. Even the brochures just list the basic specifications. And forget viewing an owner's manual on-line. Maybe it's just me but I find it very frustrating when I go to those websites trying to find tractor details.

That's one thing I give Deere and Kubota, they make it very easy to do research prior to stepping on a dealers lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
2025R(Gen II) has a a 15inch bigger turn radius than the 1025R.
Not according to JD specs, though the ones on their website seem to be for the previous generation. Where did you find 8.7? That doesn't sound right at all. That's just a few inches shy of the large frame 2R's turning radius, and there is no way the 2025R doesn't smoke those tractors in maneuverability.

Also not according to my own testing. I measured just a few inches difference between the two. I took both to the same spot in the dirt, put down a marker (a stone) at the starting point and made several turns as tightly as possible. The results were about 2-4" apart, depending on whether you go with the first full turn or the subsequent ones.
 

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You already said it.
Deere does more things right than the others.

As someone else said, big tires sell.
Its an easy way to tell someone "hey, look, this is bigger because its sits higher and has bigger tires", and those not knowing any better think its great.
My guess is lots of guys who throw 44s on their trucks love the other brands.
All things equal, putting larger tires on the same tractor decreases power to the ground. It takes more torque to turn a larger diameter wheel/tire.
This was a big "complaint" about the 2025, mostly from those who hadnt used one.
In the real world, most of these will run out of traction long before power. Some of those extra large tired tractors can run out of power before they run out of traction.
More to the point, they most certainly are putting larger tires on than they used to.
Whats comparable today to the 955? Power wise it would be at least a 2032 or maybe 3032, but size wise, its almost identical to the new 2025 and probably the old 2025 too.
How big are the tires on the 2032? 3032?

The ultimate goal of any company selling anything is to appeal to the most buyers they can within their target market.
Its an easy step from a garden tractor to a 1025. Thats the whole point of all the SCUTs. To get people buying things they wouldnt have otherwise bought. Quite a large number of 1025 (and similar sized tractors from all brands) wouldnt own a larger tractor.
Im not sure how anyone can get mad at a company for doing what all companies do, and what keeps them in business.
As to Mahindras large SCUT, thats marketing. They are the only ones doing that, and while they like to compare them to smaller tractors, real testing is done against similar sized/spec'd tractors. There are a few places you can find online doing comparisons and reviews on these tractors.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
You already said it.
Deere does more things right than the others.

As someone else said, big tires sell.
Its an easy way to tell someone "hey, look, this is bigger because its sits higher and has bigger tires", and those not knowing any better think its great.
My guess is lots of guys who throw 44s on their trucks love the other brands.
All things equal, putting larger tires on the same tractor decreases power to the ground. It takes more torque to turn a larger diameter wheel/tire.
This was a big "complaint" about the 2025, mostly from those who hadnt used one.
In the real world, most of these will run out of traction long before power. Some of those extra large tired tractors can run out of power before they run out of traction.
More to the point, they most certainly are putting larger tires on than they used to.
Whats comparable today to the 955? Power wise it would be at least a 2032 or maybe 3032, but size wise, its almost identical to the new 2025 and probably the old 2025 too.
How big are the tires on the 2032? 3032?
Thank you, this is what I wanted to know. I suspected it was just marketing, but I thought maybe there could be a reason based on application, and that's why I asked. My only experience with tractors is for landowner stuff, I have never farmed with one. And the farm tractors I see around here are quite large, with very large wheels/tires.
 

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Thank you, this is what I wanted to know. I suspected it was just marketing, but I thought maybe there could be a reason based on application, and that's why I asked. My only experience with tractors is for landowner stuff, I have never farmed with one. And the farm tractors I see around here are quite large, with very large wheels/tires.
I will give you a reason. The CUT and SCUT line in Deere are all advertised with decks under them. Turning radius becomes important but even more so you have to have room for a deck between the tires including when turning. It’s a tight fit now with the tires they use. I don’t know that any other manufacture has as many options/attachments available that Deere does.

I will add that Deere covers a very large range of sizes. Others are trying to compete with a tractor that needs to cover a couple of sizes of Deere’s.
 

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Not according to JD specs, though the ones on their website seem to be for the previous generation. Where did you find 8.7? That doesn't sound right at all. That's just a few inches shy of the large frame 2R's turning radius, and there is no way the 2025R doesn't smoke those tractors in maneuverability.

Also not according to my own testing. I measured just a few inches difference between the two. I took both to the same spot in the dirt, put down a marker (a stone) at the starting point and made several turns as tightly as possible. The results were about 2-4" apart, depending on whether you go with the first full turn or the subsequent ones.
Look on the Main website Under Dimensions Turning radius without brakes for the 2025R 2 Family Compact Utility Tractors | 2025R | John Deere US It is listed at 8.7 feet and Then Go Look at the a Manual :read for the 2025R under specifications(turning radius)8.7 Feet:bigthumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Look on the Main website Under Dimensions Turning radius without brakes for the 2025R 2 Family Compact Utility Tractors | 2025R | John Deere US It is listed at 8.7 feet and Then Go Look at the a Manual :read for the 2025R under specifications(turning radius)8.7 Feet:bigthumb:
Apparently they have two web pages for that tractor, with the wrong info one of them. This one lists the specs for the old one on a page describing the new one, and it's the page google sent me to:

https://www.deere.com/en/tractors/utility-tractors/2-family-compact-utility-tractors/2025r-compact-utility-tractor/

So apparently, if your information is correct (I concede I am not the most scientific tester), then they did something to the new one that increased it's turning radius by an entire foot over the previous generation, despite the wheels/tires being the exact same size. What that may be, I cannot imagine (and yes, it was 7.7ft without brakes). Or the new specs are measured using a different standard (which I think is more likely than a mysterious increase of 12").

Since we were discussing tire size and maneuverability, my original point still stands. 7.4ft for 1025R, and 7.7ft for 2025R(Gen 1). No real practical difference.
 
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