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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Does anyone have any experience getting rid of a roosting wild turkey? We recently started seeing them and now I have a persistent turkey on my chimney. So far... water doesn't work...rushing them with a broom = temporary solution and requires traipsing all over roof surface. Right now , I'm leaning towards 7" stainless steel spikes. I've heard they only roost on flat surfaces but cannot confirm that. Any help would be appreciated!
Lou

:banghead: :banghead:
 

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why bother? Turkeys are nice birds and have quite the personality and lots of different voices.
 

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The only thing that is worse than a turkey that decides your house is home is a Peacock.

When I bought my house in GA I was in it for a few weeks before the wife and the pups arrived. I had a couple of turkeys on or around the house all of the time. As soon as the Brittany arrived they moved on, I am thinking it was more the dog than the wife.
 

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Every place I've ever lived (except for the various barracks and my college dormitory) allows for the shooting of nuisance critters. A 20 gauge slinging heavy game shot is a pretty good deterrent, but if you can get close enough to poke them with a broom then a small caliber pistol would probably work too. Aim for the head and hope it falls off the roof and not down the chimney. I've got a hilarious story involving a duck and a chimney I'll have to share at some point. Anyway, once word spreads around the flock that you're serious, they will probably move on.

Either a slow cooker with lots of broth or a pressure cooker is my go-to for cooking wild turkey as it is much leaner and a little tougher than the farm raised variety.
 

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Are you sure it is a turkey?

Flat surface - well if you call tree limbs a flat surface - turkeys around here roost in the trees.

That is one reason why I question if it is a turkey or not. Wild turkeys are very skittish - normally all it would take is once scaring it off the chimney and it wouldn't be back. Now turkey vultures/Buzzards and the like are a different story.

In the case of vultures and buzzards - they are carrion feeders. If there is something dead in your chimney they will be very persistent.
 

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Sure it's not a wood duck? I have had two of those down my chimney and in my fireplace. We have multiple families right now of turkeys and I have never seen one on my chimney and they do roost in the trees here too.. I have always wondered why people hunt them, we could pick them up if we wanted too, they are very used to us and our cats and the little peepers are all over mama right now, you go out and they stand perfectly still and they are not afraid of us.. Good luck with your issue.
 

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Turkeys around here run for cover when they see or hear us. Don't know why, we don't shoot them. We like seeing them though. Fun to watch. I don't think they like our roof as they just walk across our land and eat all the while they walk around.
 

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Same thought

Are you sure it is a turkey?

Flat surface - well if you call tree limbs a flat surface - turkeys around here roost in the trees.

That is one reason why I question if it is a turkey or not. Wild turkeys are very skittish - normally all it would take is once scaring it off the chimney and it wouldn't be back. Now turkey vultures/Buzzards and the like are a different story.

In the case of vultures and buzzards - they are carrion feeders. If there is something dead in your chimney they will be very persistent.
I had the same thought that they could be turkey buzzards. I've never seen a wild turkey on a roof of any kind. In the road, in trees, on the ground, in hay fields but never on a roof. Buzzards on the other hand can be a dang nuisance and they definitely will sit on a roof. Our neighbor has a shed that a tree fell on and punched a hole in the roof. They haven't fixed it or taken it down and vultures started nesting in, leading to them perching on the neighbors roof. If they get close to our roof, I use a paint ball gun on them. Now all I have to do is walk out the door and they are gone from the neighbors property.

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We have a lot of turkeys here; they come through the yard several times a day, most days. They are almost always just walking around feeding; if not, they are sitting in the shade just taking it easy. They rarely fly, unless my Boston Terrier takes after them, and they almost always fly into the trees. We have been seeing them off and on for maybe 10 years, and I have occasionally seen them sitting on the roofs of almost all of the houses in this area. Perhaps not rare, but certainly unusual. I haven't seen it for several months now though. My sense is that it only happens when there is a big flock of them coming through; for what ever reason.l
 

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New one on me

We have a lot of turkeys here; they come through the yard several times a day, most days. They are almost always just walking around feeding; if not, they are sitting in the shade just taking it easy. They rarely fly, unless my Boston Terrier takes after them, and they almost always fly into the trees. We have been seeing them off and on for maybe 10 years, and I have occasionally seen them sitting on the roofs of almost all of the houses in this area. Perhaps not rare, but certainly unusual. I haven't seen it for several months now though. My sense is that it only happens when there is a big flock of them coming through; for what ever reason.l
That's certainly different from here. We have turkeys and sometimes pretty large flocks but I don't every remember seeing them in a yard and certainly not in a subdivision. The only times I've really gotten close to turkeys has been mowing hayfields when they sit on a nest way too long and walking up underneath them while duck hunting. (Several times I've set up for ducks under oak trees. At the first shot the tree exploded with turkeys bailing out in all directions.)

We've had almost every other wildlife run through the yard, lots of deer, squirrels, rabbits, foxes, coyotes but never a turkey that I can remember.

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We live just outside of town, on the edge of town, and get turkey in our yard regularly. The first couple photos are from my game cam on the back part of our property along a creek. In the third photo, the large flock is about 40 feet from our house. That photo was taken exactly one week before spring turkey season opened...

Moultrie turkey1.jpg

Moultrie turkey2.jpg

turkey in yard.jpg
 

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Last year about this same time, and we had probably three families with different birthing times too, very strange in my opinion as to why they give birth at different times. like weeks apart, from little peepers the size of a baseball to what you see here.. I don't shoot them, there just cool to watch..

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Last year about this same time, and we had probably three families with different birthing times too, very strange in my opinion as to why they give birth at different times. like weeks apart, from little peepers the size of a baseball to what you see here.. I don't shoot them, there just cool to watch..
Turkeys will have a couple batches of young. The first batch is in early spring and a lot of times don't survive due to the cold and wet. They will then hatch a second batch about a month or so later. If they all survive you will see a hen with 2 sets of young in different sizes.
 

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Turkeys will have a couple batches of young. The first batch is in early spring and a lot of times don't survive due to the cold and wet. They will then hatch a second batch about a month or so later. If they all survive you will see a hen with 2 sets of young in different sizes.
We have a few families out there in fact they are on their way up to the house right now, If it keeps the wife busy watching them and her not watching me,, I think it's great! Thanks for the reply, I am no Frank Buck and know nothing about turkeys and such..
 

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Turkeys will have a couple batches of young. The first batch is in early spring and a lot of times don't survive due to the cold and wet. They will then hatch a second batch about a month or so later. If they all survive you will see a hen with 2 sets of young in different sizes.
We occasionally see different hens with different size chicks, but I have never seen one hen with different size chicks...unless of course the early batch were large enough to appear to be adults. We didn't see any chicks at all this Spring early, but we are seeing some now; the chicks are probably half grown. We are in a suburban area, but border on some very rural pasture and timber. There has been so much development the last few years that I believe they are displacing a lot of the wildlife. Couple that with the fact that we are in the city limits now, and hunting is prohibited.

Our turkeys are almost tame. They are not much of a pest, but they do sometimes make a mess on the drive and on the deck. They also dust themselves in areas where I am trying to get the grass to grow. My neighbor has a feeder for them, where she puts out cracked corn...amazingly enough, it also attracts Canadian geese and of all things, Mallard ducks.

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Discussion Starter #17
why bother? Turkeys are nice birds and have quite the personality and lots of different voices.
Not so nice when they are destroying a roof...
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Every place I've ever lived (except for the various barracks and my college dormitory) allows for the shooting of nuisance critters. A 20 gauge slinging heavy game shot is a pretty good deterrent, but if you can get close enough to poke them with a broom then a small caliber pistol would probably work too. Aim for the head and hope it falls off the roof and not down the chimney. I've got a hilarious story involving a duck and a chimney I'll have to share at some point. Anyway, once word spreads around the flock that you're serious, they will probably move on.

Either a slow cooker with lots of broth or a pressure cooker is my go-to for cooking wild turkey as it is much leaner and a little tougher than the farm raised variety.
Like the way you think!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Are you sure it is a turkey?

Flat surface - well if you call tree limbs a flat surface - turkeys around here roost in the trees.

That is one reason why I question if it is a turkey or not. Wild turkeys are very skittish - normally all it would take is once scaring it off the chimney and it wouldn't be back. Now turkey vultures/Buzzards and the like are a different story.

In the case of vultures and buzzards - they are carrion feeders. If there is something dead in your chimney they will be very persistent.
Definitely wild turkey.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
ON Sat Night after putting a number of " deterrents on the chimney including rose bush cutting w thorns ( it laid on those) and Holly tree cuttings (avoided them) I finally got up on the roof and swatted it with a rake. Haven't seen it since. Ordered stainless steel bird spikes today, will see them Tues.
 
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