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I’m looking for a shed to dry and store firewood and I same across this. The inside portion is 10x24. Putting pallets down inside, and stacking 3 rows deep, the full 24ft long, will firewood dry with only the front being exposed ? And possibly not much sun due to the overhang? BD76620C-D7C5-41BA-AEE6-630219896C8E.png
 

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IMO needs a window or vent in the end and on back side. Need air to circulate ,
 

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Will it dry out? Sure. But it will take forever.
You MUST have air circulation to dry out wood.
If you look at woodsheds people have built, youll see that the sides and top are ventilated.

Now, you could use it, but youd have to figure a way to get air moving on the back side. Maybe vent panels installed all around?
 

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As others said you need air movement to dry the wood. Moving air is far more important than sun exposure.

Large gable vents on both ends and one or two vents in the rear wall should help the wood dry out in a shed like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the responses guys. That’s also what I was thinking, making some kind of vents to allow the air to move through the building
 

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My sister had a shed like that,, they filled it with split hardwood,, on pallets.
the plan was to have wood for the next three years,,

By the third year, the wood was useless,, it had been consumed by termites,,:flag_of_truce:
 

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It will dry

I agree with the others that wood dries faster if you have air moving but that shed's not air tight so it will dry with the shed in the current configuration. For years, I put wood in an old grain bin and it dried just fine in that.

Termites are an issue. If you can have the ground treated first and then put a layer of rock or milled asphalt down, it will help. I didn't see your location but in our area if wood is touching the ground, you will eventually get termites unless you treat. Cholorodane is off the market but it was far superior at keeping termites away, regardless of other issues it may have caused.

If you rotate your wood and don't let it stay in one spot too long, it helps with termites and other bugs. One of these days, I'd like to build a solar firewood kiln with a design to get the wood hot enough to kill most bugs but that's hard to do in our area if you are using only solar. BTW, your shed cold be easily adapted to a solar kiln if you wanted to. Most of the kilns have a similar shape with a solar collection area leading to a plenum.

Treefarmer
 

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That looks perfect for storing a tractor:flag_of_truce:
 

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I’m looking for a shed to dry and store firewood and I same across this. The inside portion is 10x24. Putting pallets down inside, and stacking 3 rows deep, the full 24ft long, will firewood dry with only the front being exposed ? And possibly not much sun due to the overhang? View attachment 703684
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I just posted this to the fire wood thread. I'm using a similar type of building but without a front or back and the wood dries real well! But, you'll do yourself a favor by stacking the rows front to back and not side to side so the air / wind can get at it. I use some large tarps the span the front and back during the winter so the snow doesn't blow in and cover everything inside - including my tractor:greentractorride:
 

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I sunk four posts in the ground and built a lean-to roof with 4 open sides, 6x6 sleepers resting on 6x6 cribs to stack it on. You can hang cut down tarps if you want to keep the snow from drifting in. Cheap, fast and the wood dries quickly. Thats down back and then I move the dry wood up to a nice looking shed out the back door for winter hauling and dry storage. Last split, first in the upper shed, always dry for burning.Try to have next years wood cut to length stacked on skids near the splitter for a year.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the replies guys. This shed is scheduled to get built in a few weeks! I already site prepped which included stripping the top soil, leveling, and hauling in about 30 ton of 2a modified and made a pad which became a very hard surface for this to be built. For bugs I plan to spray the perimeter with insecticide once or twice a year ( I hold a pesticide applicator license ). As for storage, my tractor stays in my garage, however I definitely think I am going to keep a few attachments under there along with my supersplit. I plan on putting my plastic pallets inside for the firewood to be stacked. I’m thinking 2 rows deep and 4 pallets long, and the rest of the space for maybe the attachments. Not sure how I’ll utilize the over hang part, maybe a nice lawn chair and a cooler of beer standing guard while the wood dries ? 😂
 

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Carpenter ants alway did much more damage to our wood piles than termites. If you're building near any trees, look for access routes other than out of the ground...
 

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For best drying, keep the roof, but leave the sides open.

As for carpenter ants, they won't bother dry wood, as they only will try to nest in rotten, wet wood. They don't eat any wood, only make their way into rotted wood.

Problem I had with the open shed was the raccoons that over time started using it as a gathering spot for their communal meetings.. they crap on the wood and the other raccoons can visit and know who was there, what they were eating, and its like facebook gossiping. Google Raccoon latrine rest stops" for more info. The parasites in the scat are a concern, so I enclosed the wood shed, removed the firewood to open-drying storage on pallets, and put the stacks of pallet'd wood under squares of rubber roofing.. about 1/5 cord to each pallet. Move the pallets of wood to the garage for feeding the indoor wood boiler. Plenty dry after 2-3 years.
 

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As for carpenter ants, they won't bother dry wood, as they only will try to nest in rotten, wet wood. They don't eat any wood, only make their way into rotted wood.
It must vary by location/subspecies -- my dad stacked lumber from the sawmill until it was needed for hay wagons, sheds, etc. The stacks were riddled with carpenter ants when we opened them up. I agree the ants don't eat dry wood, but their nesting tunnels were impressive.
 

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It must vary by location/subspecies -- my dad stacked lumber from the sawmill until it was needed for hay wagons, sheds, etc. The stacks were riddled with carpenter ants when we opened them up. I agree the ants don't eat dry wood, but their nesting tunnels were impressive.
Maybe solid stacked without drying stickers, and the wood decayed while stacked. Decay sets in quickly.
Carpenter ants like that scenario for their home building nests. Not good at that point for hay wagons.
Happens often if not stickered for drying and even then requires good air movement to store green lumber fresh from the sawmill while it air dries.
 

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As for carpenter ants, they won't bother dry wood...
"That’s a common misconception. It’s true that carpenter ants usually infest wood that has been water-damaged, but it’s not always the case. They’re perfectly capable of chewing into dry wood as well. The ants prefer wood that has been wet or moldy since it is softer and therefore easier to excavate galleries for their nest. They will initially move into a home where there has been a roof leak, plumbing leak, condensation, or a drainage problem. The wood may still be damp or long since dried. Once carpenter ants have established a nest in that area, they can move on to infest totally dry wood nearby."
https://www.colonialpest.com/carpenter-ants-can-infest-perfectly-dry-wood/
 

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That's a nice run in shed. Had one similiar 10x 12. Wood dried just fine. Ours faced south, which was a big help in the winter.
Never had termites but did have problems with power post beatles. Kinda crazy.
 

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Beautiful new shed you'll have there. I'm "green" with envy. :greentractorride:
My buddy burns wood, (has a wood insert in his fireplace), and has a shed exactly like yours, (but only about 2/3rds the size). Open side faces north, enclosed on both ends and rear, and has never complained about rotting, or bug infested wood. However he does use most of it up in one season, and refills for the following.
I burn in a stove too, (100 yr old Glenwood 111), but use anthracite coal, so I don't need a shed. It doesn't care about water, or bugs, is already bagged, burns 3 times longer than wood, doesn't require chopping, cutting to size, stacking or splitting, and puts out twice the heat per volume. But I guess if you're young, and or like the exercise, or get the wood for free, it's an understandable alternate. But I will admit, I like watching a wood fire, and enjoy the smell. (That's why I have a fire pit, outside):)

 

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I’m looking for a shed to dry and store firewood and I same across this. The inside portion is 10x24. Putting pallets down inside, and stacking 3 rows deep, the full 24ft long, will firewood dry with only the front being exposed ? And possibly not much sun due to the overhang? View attachment 703684
you need air vents along the bottom on all sides and tops. This will force air to circulate as the warm air rises cooler air will enter at the bottom drying the wood.
 
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