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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Started finishing the basement the other day. No big hurry to get it done, so it my take a couple of winters to complete. We did all the basement HVAC, plumbing and electrical when we built our house, so I just have drywall, paint, and flooring to do.

This will be my first attempt and taping and mudding drywall. Hopefully I won't mess it up to bad.... I'm sure this part of the project will be the most time consuming as the basement is 2000 sq feet.
 

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Nice start (y)
 

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Around here you can find a guy to do the mudding on the side pretty cheap. I've tried mudding, I hire it done every time, I suck at it. :rolleyes:
 

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Nobody sucks at it worse than me. Just sayin! 🤣
If I had a pic of the back wall of my old house, I might win. I wound up with so much mud on there it looked like a boob. :LOL:
 

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how tall are your ceilings? I'd personally get 4x10 sheets and hang them vertically. No need for horizontal positioning because you're in the basement. Vertical orientation gives you less seams to tape and finish, and no butt joints either.
 

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What brand of insulation did you use? Looks good!
 

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If you haven't bought all of the drywall, look into 54" wide sheets. I am personally a fan of the horizontal seam, but the 54" sheets will eliminate one of the seams. Sadly, most 9' foundations don't yield a full 108" wall. So you you may have to rip one of the sheets. I have hung the 54" X 12' sheets. There are a lot of 54" X 14' sheets in my house. It definitely reduces the seams which is better all around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
how tall are your ceilings? I'd personally get 4x10 sheets and hang them vertically. No need for horizontal positioning because you're in the basement. Vertical orientation gives you less seams to tape and finish, and no butt joints either.
Ceiling is just under 9 feet. We had left over drywall when we built the house, so using that up first. It a mix of 12 and 8 foot sheets all 4 feet wide. I saved all the large cut offs as well to use on interior closets and other small walls that don't require full sheets. This wall will have storage shelves built against it. I'm using this area as my tape and mud test wall to judge if I can complete that task successfully. If not it will be hidden behind the shelves...lol!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Around here you can find a guy to do the mudding on the side pretty cheap. I've tried mudding, I hire it done every time, I suck at it. :rolleyes:
You're probably right. We are doing this a bit at a time. So that might not be the best option for this project. I'd most likely have to have someone out 4 or 5 time throughout the project to do that work. Might be most $$$ doing it that way. But if I butcher my test area I may go this route.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If you haven't bought all of the drywall, look into 54" wide sheets. I am personally a fan of the horizontal seam, but the 54" sheets will eliminate one of the seams. Sadly, most 9' foundations don't yield a full 108" wall. So you you may have to rip one of the sheets. I have hung the 54" X 12' sheets. There are a lot of 54" X 14' sheets in my house. It definitely reduces the seams which is better all around.
I haven't bought any yet, just burning though the leftovers from our house build. The bigger sheets are nice to reduce the seem count, but man those things are a pain to move and hang.

I won't place them vertically. They did that in my garage and it has already started cracking at 3 to 4 joints. I don't think it adds enough rigidity to the studs to reduce stress cracks due to settling.
 

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I'd like to finish the basement at our new house. It's studded and insulated but the previous owners/ builder installed six large fixed glass windows and the stairway is not drywall friendly so unless I pull a set of windows I have no way to get more materials into the basement. I know that's not a huge project to pull a window but I'm just not as motivated to do such things as I once was and I'm not entirely in love with living here.
 

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RSF, You mentioned butchering the mud job... can't be done! With enough mud and energy it will come out as good as you want it to. I did a 12x25 ceiling, plus a couple of small walls. I used five 5gal. buckets of mud and probably sanded off 4-4/12 buckets! It also took me about 3 months, but this was in my kitchen and I kept going until I liked it!

One item I found helped when sanding was "screen cloth". It looks like a plain window screen but has abrasive on it. I found sand paper would "load up" and a sponge took off very little. Screen cloth allows the removed particles to fall through the screen and doesn't "load up"... although if doing a ceiling, particles tend to "load up" your hair. Bob
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
RSF, You mentioned butchering the mud job... can't be done! With enough mud and energy it will come out as good as you want it to. I did a 12x25 ceiling, plus a couple of small walls. I used five 5gal. buckets of mud and probably sanded off 4-4/12 buckets! It also took me about 3 months, but this was in my kitchen and I kept going until I liked it!

One item I found helped when sanding was "screen cloth". It looks like a plain window screen but has abrasive on it. I found sand paper would "load up" and a sponge took off very little. Screen cloth allows the removed particles to fall through the screen and doesn't "load up"... although if doing a ceiling, particles tend to "load up" your hair. Bob
I've been doing some research and you are correct on the screen cloth type sanding material. That's on my list of things to grab when I get the mud and other materials.

My plan is to put on multiple thin layers, spreading the mud wider at each layer until I have enough coverage, then sand. In the past I've only done small repairs and it has taken me multiple sanding and mud applications to get it to look good.

I have a full suit and respirator type mask when it's time to sand. Going to see if they make some type of sanding block that I can attach my shopvac to as well in an effort to keep dust to a minimum.
 
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Multiple layers is the way to go, BUT! Don't try to sand it "flat". especially at a cut joint. If you look at a "prepared joint" that's on the edge of sheetrock, there's a slight depression. adding mud, then tape, then more mud, and you've got a pile! Sand it flat and you're probably going to be down to tape!

I'd say, since time isn't an issue, put up 2 sheets and finish the joint to your liking. If it takes a week...or 3... so be it. If it's just too frustrating, hire it out. Another hint: do NOT watch a pro! About 3 motions and the joint is near perfect. A sponging and it is perfect! What you did in a week or 3 he'll do in 10 minutes and it'll make ya sick! Bob
 

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Consider renting a drywall lift. I have rented them several times. They can be used for the upper sheet on the wall and are a must for ceilings. Where are you located? I have one that bought to do my basement and ended up hiring out the entire job. I am located in central Maryland. If you are nearby let me know.
 

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I'd like to finish the basement at our new house. It's studded and insulated but the previous owners/ builder installed six large fixed glass windows and the stairway is not drywall friendly so unless I pull a set of windows I have no way to get more materials into the basement. I know that's not a huge project to pull a window but I'm just not as motivated to do such things as I once was and I'm not entirely in love with living here.
just remove the sashes


Consider renting a drywall lift. I have rented them several times. They can be used for the upper sheet on the wall and are a must for ceilings. Where are you located? I have one that bought to do my basement and ended up hiring out the entire job. I am located in central Maryland. If you are nearby let me know.

you can buy on from HF for about 200 bucks or less. you will spend that it a couple of rentals
 

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