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If I had a pic of the back wall of my old house, I might win. I wound up with so much mud on there it looked like a boob. :LOL:
When I was doing my remodel a couple of years ago I extended the bathroom wall to the hallway by about 10". Two strips of drywall at each corner and 1 joint above the door frame. Figured that ain't so bad, I'll tape it myself (never done before). No matter what I did it didn't look right. Finally asked a friend who's a carpenter to help me out. He came in, took one look at the mess, and ripped everything I did out and started over. He later told me he could have fixed my mess but it would have taken 3 times as long as redoing it fresh. I gave him all my brand new taping knives! :cautious:
 

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Multiple thin coats. I recommend using the light/medium foam sanding blocks. They work fantastic. Did my entire house myself. When they load up tap it on the ground or put the shop vac on the sponge and it’s like brand new again.
 
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2005 3320 with FEL, 1978 AC 5020 FEL, 2000 Bobcat 763
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If you have butt joints, try dimpling them on each edge to give the mud a better bed to stick to. My dad would call it bruising them. The goal is to create an area similar to the taper on the side edge of the sheets. If I remember correctly my guy also cut the paper back about an inch on each side with a knife. I think you are on the right track of experimenting in an area to find out what technique you are most comfortable with. I am going to finish part of my basement this spring also, but a pro will do the drywall finish, I learned from experience it is a skill I do not have.
 

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Sometimes it pays to have the drywall hung by same person that’s doing the mud. I watched a dry waller do a complete floor on a 3 bedroom rancher in 4 hrs. He carried a 4’x12’ sheet under one arm to walk it in each room.
I don’t think a professional mudder would be to happy with the double horizontal seams.
But then again the only way to learn is by doing it yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Sometimes it pays to have the drywall hung by same person that’s doing the mud. I watched a dry waller do a complete floor on a 3 bedroom rancher in 4 hrs. He carried a 4’x12’ sheet under one arm to walk it in each room.
I don’t think a professional mudder would be to happy with the double horizontal seams.
But then again the only way to learn is by doing it yourself.
These are 4x8 left over sheet from my house build. So that's the reason for the double seam. I opted to place them in the middle for ease of finishing so I don't need to sit on the floor or stand on a ladder for extended period of time.

Depending on how this "test" area goes I may end up hiring the finishing out.
 

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While things are still opened up, frame out a window opening. I’m not joking. Frame it the size to hold a large screen TV, and connect the TV panel to an outdoor camera with a pleasant view of your place. It will make the basement room a much more pleasant place to hang out in, having a live view of the outdoors.
 

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5 gal mud bucket, add pint to pint and half of water and mix well, then mix some more. When smooth and bubble free it will be a lot easier. Whip it on and stop messing with it. Every touch it dries more and gets worse to work with. Add many thin coats, sand last and light or you rip it all off. 180 sanding grid on a dust collecting handle available at big box store. make sure you put extra drywall filter in vac to protect the motor from dust. many many good videos (and bad) on utube for mud techniques. use a 'drywall primer' when you are ready to start painting.
 

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Out of curiosity why did you go with stone wool over fiberglass? I have found stone wool is much coarser and itchy to work with.
Maybe I'm not reading this correctly but it appears he used aluminum covered foam Thermax, a dow product, on the concrete walls, studded and is using Thermafiber insulation over the dow product. He could have used regular insulation but went with the fire and sound guard instead.. Much more expensive too. He will also have piece of mind using that material. I also want to say, that is the correct way to cover/insulate a basement cement wall. You can also use regular insulation for this instead of Thermafiber.
Mudding isn't that hard if you have the correct tools. I suggest watching it done,, it's actually simple, and I would not suggest tapping on the but joints to hard, that only breaks the drywall up inside the two coverings then you got junk in a very short time frame. But joints are easily taken care of without doing damage to the board in the first place. Get all your screwheads three times.. and don't rush the drying time between coats.
Take your time and you will have a very nice finished project.. I can see it already! Drop ceiling?
I would also suggest a sand pole to do all your sanding with the screen abrasives, remember to use a medium at first then a fine for a final sanding. Course may ruin your drywall if sanded to deep. You shouldn't need a course screen. The screens will come sized to fit the sand pole by the way.. Jeff
Office supplies Electric blue Slope Font Tool
 
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Out of curiosity why did you go with stone wool over fiberglass? I have found stone wool is much coarser and itchy to work with.
I like the mineral wool better for sound dampening between rooms. I used it upstairs as well and it does a pretty good job. Of course you have to seal up every little hole to really make it work.
 
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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
While things are still opened up, frame out a window opening. I’m not joking. Frame it the size to hold a large screen TV, and connect the TV panel to an outdoor camera with a pleasant view of your place. It will make the basement room a much more pleasant place to hang out in, having a live view of the outdoors.
Got that view covered on the other side of the basement. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Maybe I'm not reading this correctly but it appears he used aluminum covered foam Thermax, a dow product, on the concrete walls, studded and is using Thermafiber insulation over the dow product. He could have used regular insulation but went with the fire and sound guard instead.. Much more expensive too. He will also have piece of mind using that material. I also want to say, that is the correct way to cover/insulate a basement cement wall. You can also use regular insulation for this instead of Thermafiber.
Mudding isn't that hard if you have the correct tools. I suggest watching it done,, it's actually simple, and I would not suggest tapping on the but joints to hard, that only breaks the drywall up inside the two coverings then you got junk in a very short time frame. But joints are easily taken care of without doing damage to the board in the first place. Get all your screwheads three times.. and don't rush the drying time between coats.
Take your time and you will have a very nice finished project.. I can see it already! Drop ceiling?
I would also suggest a sand pole to do all your sanding with the screen abrasives, remember to use a medium at first then a fine for a final sanding. Course may ruin your drywall if sanded to deep. You shouldn't need a course screen. The screens will come sized to fit the sand pole by the way.. Jeff
View attachment 821654
Yeah, we used 1 inch thermal on the inside of the poured walls, 2 inch thick formular 250 on the outside and 4 inches under the slab. We have in floor radiant heat. Per building code here we had to drywall the basement ceiling to pass final inspection.
 

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That sand pole will come in handy sanding the ceilings and corners. I have so many of those my back hurts just looking at them.
We stopped using those years ago and went with plaster. Faster and less mess for sure, no sanding required.
Have fun..
 
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I have found stone wool is much coarser and itchy to work with.
Funny - I found rock wool to be much less itchy and easier to work. :unsure:

frame out a window opening. ... TV panel to an outdoor camera with a pleasant view of your place. It will make the basement room a much more pleasant place to hang out in, having a live view of the outdoors.
Great idea. Similar to how we used TV tuned to ship's forward camera in an inside cabin. Sure helped hubby the one day when he had to stay there because of a fall.
 
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