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So, I just bought a 2019 1023E. Now that it's spring, it might seem a little premature to you southeners to be asking about winter operation but this is Minnesota and we prepare for winter year round. As we say..."3 months of winter and 9 months of bad sledding". In point of fact, it snowed here about a week ago.

If I'm going to use this tractor in a Minnesota winter, do I need a block heater on the engine?
 

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It’s a good idea, but I’ve honestly never had a problem without one down to -20. That’s as cold as it gets here.
 

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If you have a place to plug it in a block heater will make a huge difference. Yes, it will probably still start in very cold temperatures but the block heater will minimize the amount of black smoke, coughing and sputtering until it gets going.

Make sure you have some winter fuel treatment on hand and be sure to treat your fuel before it gets super cold. I use the JD-branded Fuel Protect - Winter Blend all year round but if you ask 10 people what they use you'll probably get 9 different answers.

If possible, keep your battery on a battery tender during the winter months. I use a Battery Tender Jr. It really makes a difference in helping to keep your battery in peak condition during the cold weather.

Also, have a couple spare fuel filters on hand. Should the unthinkable happen and your fuel jells up despite being treated you will likely need to swap fuel filters to get it going.
 

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If you have a place to plug it in a block heater will make a huge difference. Yes, it will probably still start in very cold temperatures but the block heater will minimize the amount of black smoke, coughing and sputtering until it gets going.

Make sure you have some winter fuel treatment on hand and be sure to treat your fuel before it gets super cold. I use the JD-branded Fuel Protect - Winter Blend all year round but if you ask 10 people what they use you'll probably get 9 different answers.

If possible, keep your battery on a battery tender during the winter months. I use a Battery Tender Jr. It really makes a difference in helping to keep your battery in peak condition during the cold weather.

Also, have a couple spare fuel filters on hand. Should the unthinkable happen and your fuel jells up despite being treated you will likely need to swap fuel filters to get it going.
Concise succinct advise.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If you have a place to plug it in a block heater will make a huge difference. Yes, it will probably still start in very cold temperatures but the block heater will minimize the amount of black smoke, coughing and sputtering until it gets going.

Make sure you have some winter fuel treatment on hand and be sure to treat your fuel before it gets super cold. I use the JD-branded Fuel Protect - Winter Blend all year round but if you ask 10 people what they use you'll probably get 9 different answers.

If possible, keep your battery on a battery tender during the winter months. I use a Battery Tender Jr. It really makes a difference in helping to keep your battery in peak condition during the cold weather.

Also, have a couple spare fuel filters on hand. Should the unthinkable happen and your fuel jells up despite being treated you will likely need to swap fuel filters to get it going.
Thank you. My dealer mentioned that he has some kind of fuel treatment that he recommends for use during the period between when the stations switch over to summer blend and winter is still raging. End of winter is not always a predictable event around here. As to battery charging...I have a wide variety of 12-volt rolling stock around here and have a veritable fleet of Battery Tenders. All of those vehicles have dangling two-prong pigtails, and this 1023E will have one soon too. Great tip on the extra fuel filters. I'm a diesel newbie.
 

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I use the Deere winter fuel treatment year round, keeps me from getting caught out without treated fuel when it gets cold.
 

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Where is the 1023 kept? Outside or in a heated area?

The coldest mine ever gets is 45 degrees so nothing is obviously needed and I run regular HyGard oil rather than the Low viscosity too.
 

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ND here, I keep mine in an insulated attached garage, so it stays above freezing. Block heater is not required in that case.
I do have one though, because I live in ND, and you never know.

So yes, I would get one. VERY cheap insurance for that time you don't know is coming.
 

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So, I just bought a 2019 1023E. Now that it's spring, it might seem a little premature to you southeners to be asking about winter operation but this is Minnesota and we prepare for winter year round. As we say..."3 months of winter and 9 months of bad sledding". In point of fact, it snowed here about a week ago.

If I'm going to use this tractor in a Minnesota winter, do I need a block heater on the engine?
I usually run mine on the 4510 if its below 30 degrees, because it starts really nicely and gets the oil moving faster.

I'm in Indiana btw.
 

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Where is the 1023 kept? Outside or in a heated area?

The coldest mine ever gets is 45 degrees so nothing is obviously needed and I run regular HyGard oil rather than the Low viscosity too.
My tractor is kept in an unheated garage. We can usually expect a few winter days at -30F, sometimes more. This past winter we did get a day or two at -44F. That's pretty unusual.

I'll have to ask the dealer about cost to install.
 

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My tractor is kept in an unheated garage. We can usually expect a few winter days at -30F, sometimes more. This past winter we did get a day or two at -44F. That's pretty unusual.

I'll have to ask the dealer about cost to install.
You will thank yourself someday for getting installed now. You might only actually need a few times a year but when you do you’ll be happy.

Just a tip - don’t plan on plugging it in overnight or for any extended period. It will make you cry when you get your electricity bill.

Most use a timer - set it to run for 2 hours before you expect to use the tractor. I suppose with all this new fangled WiFi stuff a person could set one up to control with their telephone.
 
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