Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 137 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,143 Posts
When driving for Advance I proved worn out winter tires had better traction ,and stopping distance than a brand new pair of 3 season tires.

The store manager thought I was nuts till he seen it with his own eyes.

He was still only able to convince the distract manager to put winter tires on one of the 4 or 5 delivery vehicles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,592 Posts
I've always been a firm believer in snow tires, no such thing as "all season" IMO.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,143 Posts
I've always been a firm believer in snow tires, no such thing as "all season" IMO.
Me too.

Have always put winter tires on every vehicle I driven in the winter.

A few winter ago, Goodyear came out with a All Weather Tire, our daughter has them on her Outback , and I put them on our Sienna AWD last winter. Drove in 8-15" of snow last winter and felt as safe as having true winter tires.

These are the new tire pattern they came out with last fall when I bought mine. https://www.goodyear.com/en-US/tires/assurance-weatherready




This is the tire tread my daughter and I have .

goodyear tire on van.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,592 Posts
Me too.

Have always put winter tires on every vehicle I driven in the winter.

A few winter ago, Goodyear came out with a All Weather Tire, our daughter has them on her Outback , and I put them on our Sienna AWD last winter. Drove in 8-15" of snow last winter and felt as safe as having true winter tires.

These are the new tire pattern they came out with last fall when I bought mine. https://www.goodyear.com/en-US/tires/assurance-weatherready




This is the tire tread my daughter and I have .

View attachment 658956
That's a good looking tire, I will say that with the popularity of AWD vehicles the tire companies have come out with some pretty aggressive "all season" tires. My wife has had two Chevy Equinox AWD's and we only ran Bridgestone Dueler H/T's on them, they have an open shoulder like the tire you linked. Her current vehicle is a Ford Edge and that just felt scary with all seasons on it, she has had true winter tires on that for 3 years now, Hankook somethings.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,248 Posts
I've always been a firm believer in snow tires, no such thing as "all season" IMO.
One problem with just Snow Tires is there only Best for Snow and Mud but not the best on Ice and Rain Slick Surfaces. My problem is dealing with ice and wet roads during the winter. They tend to plow the snow down and leave you with something a true snow tire won't dig into very well and that is where the sipping and lots of smaller treads crossing the tires work better. Stopping fast on these surfaces take longer with Snow Tires. Now on deeper new snow and un/plowed roads the True Snow Tire works great because they self clean and have chunky treads. So for my driving conditions I want All Seasons and my Off Road stuff True Snow Tires. But then that is just me? I really hate sliding on ice trying to stop way more then having a hard time getting going in deeper snow. This is what I run on my 3/4 Ton Dodge and my Chevy 1 ton year round. There All Terrain, Mud Snow and All Season in one. Was not happy with the Cost and wear of the Toyo's these get better traction year round for me. Information on them Cooper Courser MSR LT tires.
High Traction Tread Design
The intricate tread pattern balances inter traction and a smooth, quiet ride. The deep lateral and notched circumferential grooves provide excellent evacuation of water and slush from the tread contact patch.

Patented “Snow Groove” Design Technology
Provides biting edges for excellent snow and ice traction without reducing element stiffness. The snow groove enhances the retention of snow in the outer circumferential grooves to capitalize on the higher traction characteristics of “snow on snow” versus “snow on rubber”.
Also available with metal studs for the ultimate in ice traction. For the studded version of this tire click here.

Available in Blackwall (BW) and Outlined White Letters (OWL) sidewall styles.

Mastercraft Tires are made by Cooper Tire Co. Courser Tires.jpg This is what I used to run Toyo's Toyos.jpg 1/3 plus more cost too! I left out we only own Pick Up Trucks Cars are a different breed to me not sure the ride would be nice enough and super quite like my Mother in Laws Car with those pointed tread in the pictures above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,563 Posts
One problem with just Snow Tires is there only Best for Snow and Mud but not the best on Ice and Rain Slick Surfaces. My problem is dealing with ice and wet roads during the winter. They tend to plow the snow down and leave you with something a true snow tire won't dig into very well and that is where the sipping and lots of smaller treads crossing the tires work better. Stopping fast on these surfaces take longer with Snow Tires. Now on deeper new snow and un/plowed roads the True Snow Tire works great because they self clean and have chunky treads. So for my driving conditions I want All Seasons and my Off Road stuff True Snow Tires. But then that is just me? I really hate sliding on ice trying to stop way more then having a hard time getting going in deeper snow. This is what I run on my 3/4 Ton Dodge and my Chevy 1 ton year round. There All Terrain, Mud Snow and All Season in one. Was not happy with the Cost and wear of the Toyo's these get better traction year round for me. Information on them Cooper Courser MSR LT tires.
High Traction Tread Design
The intricate tread pattern balances inter traction and a smooth, quiet ride. The deep lateral and notched circumferential grooves provide excellent evacuation of water and slush from the tread contact patch.

Patented “Snow Groove” Design Technology
Provides biting edges for excellent snow and ice traction without reducing element stiffness. The snow groove enhances the retention of snow in the outer circumferential grooves to capitalize on the higher traction characteristics of “snow on snow” versus “snow on rubber”.
Also available with metal studs for the ultimate in ice traction. For the studded version of this tire click here.

Available in Blackwall (BW) and Outlined White Letters (OWL) sidewall styles.

Mastercraft Tires are made by Cooper Tire Co. View attachment 658958 This is what I used to run Toyo's View attachment 658960 1/3 plus more cost too! I left out we only own Pick Up Trucks Cars are a different breed to me not sure the ride would be nice enough and super quite like my Mother in Laws Car with those pointed tread in the pictures above.
Since 1989 when I purchased a Ford Ranger 5 sp, I have used studded winter tires. In 1993 I purchased a ford F250 4x4 Diesel 5 sp. I ordered it with agressive all terain tires. Well long story short, one day we ended up with freezing rain. Going very slow, made a right hand 90 degree turn after leaving a bridge and was promptly going down the road sideways pointing at the river. Needless to say, purchased winter steels and agressive studded winters on all 4 corners. Then bought a 2003 F250 4x4 diesel 6 sp, and immediately put winters all around. Had to trade due to divorce, and have had 3 Passats since. First 2 diesels till they bought #2 back, cuz of our wonderful guberment, but all 3 have had studs all around.
My wifes cars since I got remairied have had studs all around. Will never use anything but. The 93 went through a blizzard in 02 through 3 foot drifts cuz PennDot did not plow on Christmas and I had to go into the plant. Made it there and back, but a half mile from home hit one drift so hard I knocked off the serpentine belt. Thank God it was a diesel! Made it home anyway. Studds are the best!

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,484 Posts
I've never needed an actual snow tire on any of my pickups.
I just took the crappy factory Goodyear SR-A's off my truck 2 months ago, even though there was still 3/4 tread life left. They were absolutely unsafe in rain of all things.

I opted for Michelin LTX Defenders. Love these tires. Maybe it's just me, but I've driven in plenty of snow in my life, and I don't have any problems.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,338 Posts
I've sometimes thought about getting winter tires; but the cost considering I don't drive much any more makes it hard to swallow, especially since we're retired. Yes, I know that tires are cheaper than hospital stays. The other factor is Front Range Colorado's weather is so variable where it can be 70-degrees one day and literally 30-degrees and snowing the next day. Generally, snow melts within a few days after a storm, if not sooner. I can think of only one Midwest type of ice storm here and I hope like hell we never get another one. Yes, we can get nasty snowstorms like the Christmas 1982 or was it 1983 blizzard and the Thanksgiving one the following year. The winter of 2006 - 2007 had a couple of nasty storms that resulted in my using the 4200 for snow removal the only time since I bought it in 2001.

I also learned to drive with a 1950's vintage RWD car with bias ply tires, and I've never had dedicated winter tires. I just know that if I did get winter tires for the vehicles; I would get an extra set of wheels so I could swap them out easily and on my schedule. With three vehicles, that can get real pricey.

So the cars have all-season tires and the truck has all-terrain tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,149 Posts
I run Toyo open country on truck year round, just switched from Oem Goodyear wranglers after i wore them out.
Wife has winter tires on Sabaru forester which we swap out seasonally. When time for new tires on that car will look for a cross between winter and all season tires. Swapping out twice a year is $$ and a pain.
Cooper had I nice tire, can’t remember name.
Any ideas,,,,,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,177 Posts
I just ordered Cooper Discoverer M+S for the rear's of the P/U. It's needed tires badly since last spring :hide: These had good reviews and I caught them on sale at $120 each installed so it is cheaper than I was prepared to pay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
Since 1989 when I purchased a Ford Ranger 5 sp, I have used studded winter tires. In 1993 I purchased a ford F250 4x4 Diesel 5 sp. I ordered it with agressive all terain tires. Well long story short, one day we ended up with freezing rain. Going very slow, made a right hand 90 degree turn after leaving a bridge and was promptly going down the road sideways pointing at the river. Needless to say, purchased winter steels and agressive studded winters on all 4 corners. Then bought a 2003 F250 4x4 diesel 6 sp, and immediately put winters all around. Had to trade due to divorce, and have had 3 Passats since. First 2 diesels till they bought #2 back, cuz of our wonderful guberment, but all 3 have had studs all around.
My wifes cars since I got remairied have had studs all around. Will never use anything but. The 93 went through a blizzard in 02 through 3 foot drifts cuz PennDot did not plow on Christmas and I had to go into the plant. Made it there and back, but a half mile from home hit one drift so hard I knocked off the serpentine belt. Thank God it was a diesel! Made it home anyway. Studds are the best!

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
Studded tires are not legal to run on public roads here....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,539 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
A lot of this pertains to driving conditions. Around here this is the scenario - it starts snowing and sticks to the road. Vehicles are traveling on it and packs it - turns to hard pack ice right away. Then PennDOT comes out and plows while spreading a 50/50 mix of sand and salt. The plows then actually pack it down more. The roads will be that hard pack ice until the sun shines the next time.

I had some interest in the newer all terrain tires that carry the 3 mountain peak snow flake symbol now. I read an honest review on a forum I frequent from a guy who usually runs dedicated winter tires. He said they were terrible on ice for stopping but did well in actual snow.

Out west where it’s cold and actually snows the all terrain tires might do well. But around here it is usually hovering around freezing temps with a storm and are dealing with ice constantly. Warm ice is really slippery compared to cold ice. Plus we have hills and bends - lots of them. Stopping and slowing for sharp turns on steep downhill grades is the most important part for me. My confidence level with my dedicated winter tires on my 4WD pickup is awesome while of course using my head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,338 Posts
I've never needed an actual snow tire on any of my pickups.
I just took the crappy factory Goodyear SR-A's off my truck 2 months ago, even though there was still 3/4 tread life left. They were absolutely unsafe in rain of all things.

I opted for Michelin LTX Defenders. Love these tires. Maybe it's just me, but I've driven in plenty of snow in my life, and I don't have any problems.
I've had a LOT of vehicles with a lot of different tires, and I've always lived in New England where the weather is pretty unpredictable in the winter (well, all year, really). While I completely agree that there is absolutely NO COMPARISON between a winter tire and a SUMMER tire when it comes to performance in the snow, I label that video as misleading at best.

SUMMER tires claim -nothing- for performance in the snow. And they deliver on exactly what they promise. If you're running a newer CAR, you very likely have SUMMER tires on it from the factory. They do this to meet the performance claims of the vehicle in terms of acceleration, stopping, handling, etc. And, those tires work year-round for anyone that doesn't live where it snows.

If you live where it snows you should either swap out to true snow tires in the winter months, or you should be running a quality ALL SEASON tire. Note that these are not the same as ALL TERRAIN tires (which are pretty useless in the snow once you get about 10,000 or so miles on them).

I drive about 25k miles per year, and have been driving for 30 years. That's somewhere in the neighborhood of 3/4 of a million miles. And I have -NEVER- run "snow tires" on any of my vehicles but have ALWAYS run quality all season tires like the Michelin Defender LTX M+S.

A quality all season tire coupled with a driver that knows their vehicle is a great combination in any driving condition. If you -HAVE- to drive when the weather is absolutely abysmal, then by all means get snow tires.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,143 Posts
I'm going to chime in again, after reading those that have replied .

Our daughters drove FWD cars with a Mastercraft type winter tires on front. They drove everyday to WVU for school ,except for possibly 2 or 3 days a winter when WVU closed the campus. I never had to go get them being stuck or afraid to drive on the roads. Yes these tires were not the old type Town and Country tread but similar to posted by myself or those of the Mastercraft tire .

For me I have a set of steel wheels with the winter tires on for the Outback. I change or rotate my tires every 5000 miles , have for years.

Even being retired been averaging 15-20000 a year, before retiring was closer to 40000 a year plus what I drove for MaBell of 25-40000 a year for 30+ years. Around here with wet, freezing, once in a while dry snows even the best 3 seasons don't make the cut in the winter months. Driving on concrete or asphalt is far different than driving miles on dirt or gravel roads. Yes I know all of us on here live along a asphalt highway .

A former coworker had a FWD Caravan, one evening her another supervisor and myself was at the main building in downtown Morgantown. We came out and had started our vehicles and I told them since I had chains on the company van .. Requirement not by choice. Plus I was only going 4 miles till I was in my vehicle.
We left Judy try her van with new ,fair to aggressive tread to come up the drive from her parking space. She could not make, Roger in his older Caravan with a winter tire tried and he came right up the driveway spun but never to the point Judy had with her van.
Roger tried driving Judy van nope he couldn't get it up the driveway. After getting close to a gallon or more of ice melt and guessing 30 mins we got her van up the driveway. She told us she had been buying this type tire for years and was always hung up . She looked at the tires Roger had on his van and the same tires I had on our van. The next morning she was buying new winter tires on her van, her husband never had to come to her rescue over the next several years of living about a 1/2 mile up the hill behind our house. Before buying a winter type tire she would leave her van at the bottom of the hill or he would come and pull her van up the hill with his 4x4 tractor with chains. Her husband with winter tires on his 4x4 truck never had a problem. Before someone chimes in , I say never, yes you still spin ,you may still have to back down and try the hill again but making it with no chains or being pulled up the hill with a tractor is worth it to me for the extra cost , plus making it home because I could pass someone or lots of cars scared to death to drive on snow covered roads with 3 seasons tires.
For years I never knew if I would be going to work at what hour or what time I was coming home. Yes I had a regular start and quitting time, but when on call 24-7, I've been on the roads when the state police (WV and Md and sometimes PA) would stop me , then let me go because of the Logo on the side of vehicle or because of me telling them who I worked for. Sometimes I had chains on because of felt I needed them other times only winter tires.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,900 Posts
I run snow tires on both my Tundra and the other half's infinity Q50. In addition to having a more aggressive tread, most snow tires also use a softer rubber compound that helps grip on ice. That's why the Blizzaks do so well on ice. They are terrible on dry summer roads though. You can eat the tread off a Blizzak tire in a few thousand miles if you run them once it gets warm because the rubber is so soft.

I have 4WD and her car is AWD but you can definitely tell the difference in how each performs in snow with the snow tires on. I could probably get away without snows on the truck just because I don't drive at all when the weather is nasty but I have highway summer tires on it for most of the year and those are absolutely terrible on snow or ice. With snows on it, that truck will go through pretty much anything.
 

·
Senior GTT Super Slacker
Joined
·
36,127 Posts
I put Michelin X-Ice Xi3 on the Forester last year, left them on all summer, still doin good. I'll take the Forester over the 4WD F-150 any day of the week while there is snow on the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,416 Posts
I put a set of Firestone Destination AT on my Silverado a couple weeks ago. First Firestones I've had since Wide-Ovals on a Chevelle.

Firestone Dest AT.jpg
 
1 - 20 of 137 Posts
Top