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Ok ,so winter is going to be here soon. This is my first tractor 1025r. The dealer told me nothing,except to change the oil every ten hours & fuel filter. Check trans & gear link oil. I am in michigan we had a bad winter last year.I plan on using it to plow my driveway. What do I need to do to prep it & what precations should I take?This is my first diesel . It is garage kept.Not heated but insulated really well.
 

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I clean mine up after summer mowing & service them if it is time. I do not do much else different then I do in the summer.
If I am going to use it to plow snow, I make sure that the snow equipment is ready to go.

The only things I can think of that I do different is to fill the fuel tank with winter grade fuel or add anti gel fuel additive to my tanks.
Also let the tractor warm up before using it when it is cold out.
 

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A good winter diesel fuel additive is worth a serious look.
 

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Ok ,so winter is going to be here soon. This is my first tractor 1025r. The dealer told me nothing,except to change the oil every ten hours & fuel filter. Check trans & gear link oil. I am in michigan we had a bad winter last year.I plan on using it to plow my driveway. What do I need to do to prep it & what precations should I take?This is my first diesel . It is garage kept.Not heated but insulated really well.
Mad,

First of all, DO NOT CHANGE THE ENGINE OIL EVERY 10 HOURS! The oil that came from the factory is break-in oil and you need to maintain break-in oil in that little diesel for the first 100 hours of operation. After 100 hours, drain the engine oil out, change the oil filter and refill with new oil per Deere's recommendations. Subsequent oil changes are due every 200 hours. Also consider changing the small fuel filter (the one under the floor) every 200 - 300 hours. The transmission oil should be drained and replaced after the first 50 hours of operation along with the transmission oil filter. Subsequent transmission oil changes are due every 200 hours.
 

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Thank you! when should I change the fuel filter . Does the fuel at the gas station have this additive or do I have to add it my self? How long should I let it warm up?

Mad,

First of all, DO NOT CHANGE THE ENGINE OIL EVERY 10 HOURS! The oil that came from the factory is break-in oil and you need to maintain break-in oil in that little diesel for the first 100 hours of operation. After 100 hours, drain the engine oil out, change the oil filter and refill with new oil per Deere's recommendations. Subsequent oil changes are due every 200 hours. Also consider changing the small fuel filter (the one under the floor) every 200 - 300 hours. The transmission oil should be drained and replaced after the first 50 hours of operation along with the transmission oil filter. Subsequent transmission oil changes are due every 200 hours.
 

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I've never heard of changing the oil every ten hours I see no reason to. I've kept mine in a similar garage attached to house, usually it stays above zero unless its really cold and its always started. One thing I did do is turn the key on till glow plug light went out, then off and back on, heat the glow plugs twice it would start quicker and smoother with a lot less smoke.

I put a block heater on the new tractor, probably not needed but thought it would save a little wear and tear on the engine. Plus it seemed like a bargain from JD at only 70 bucks or so.

It will sound like the pistons are swapping holes and fill the garage with smoke when really cold. Give it a few minutes to warm up. I tend to keep the power down a bit when I first start plowing give the engine and hydraulics a chance to get up to operating temperature.

As mentioned get an anti gel additive once things gel up you've got a mess. Once winter gets underway the diesel is blended for cold weather. Its usually marked on the pump what the gel point is. By being careful with the fuel and the anti gel additive I have never had one gel up.
 

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Thank you! when should I change the fuel filter . Does the fuel at the gas station have this additive or do I have to add it my self? How long should I let it warm up?
You have to buy the additive Power Service is one common brand sold at most auto stores. If your gonna change the filter do whiles its still nice out.

I just let it warm up a few mins till it starts running smooth, were not talking go have a cup of coffee while it warms up. I tend to keep the rpm down maybe 1500 to 1800 for the first 5 or 10 mins of plowing just to give hydrulics and engine a chance to warm up good.
 

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Gizmo2 are you getting cheap trying to burn water in these things.
:lol: I too thought a first it was water but it was paraffin wax (diesel fuel gelling).
 

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JD sells an additive (made by Stanadyne) that works very well. The only other additive on the market I can stand behind with confidence is Opti-Lube. Too many other out manufacturers out there use alcohol or kerosene in their additives. Neither of which belong in a diesel fuel system.
 

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Is their a life to the additives? I mean, does it only last so long? This time of year I usually fill up some 5 gallon tanks and put the additive in but got to thinking, maybe that additive should be purchased new every year or so??
 

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Is their a life to the additives? I mean, does it only last so long? This time of year I usually fill up some 5 gallon tanks and put the additive in but got to thinking, maybe that additive should be purchased new every year or so??
I can't speak for all of them, but most are good for at least 1-2 years after opening the bottle but only if stored in a semi- temperate environment and not exposed to extreme heat, cold, or sunlight. I would still try to use it within a year though, just for good measure. That way you can ensure freshness and know it's working for you, not against you.

Additives can be as controversial as motor oil, tire types, etc. I am not an expert on additives by any means, but have seen what works, and some that don't. I lost a $1700 injector pump one year due to the wrong additive. It was very evident from the rebuild was caused the failure. The #3 plunger seized in the barrel. It was scored due to lack of lubrication. The shop asked about my fuel and if I used and additive. They told me what was in the stuff I had used. (I had researched this later and found their info to be true.) It was like liquid sandpaper the fuel was so dry. The rebuild shop also advised of the many things that were/are commonly used for injector pump lube are very bad for the pump. Things like ATF, used motor oil, 2 stroke oil, and other concoctions should never be poured into your fuel.

My point is, find a reputable additive that you like and trust, and use it. Do some research and don't blindly accept the hype printed on the bottle. Just because this particular product is on every store's shelves, doesn't mean it's what best for you.
 

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Hiya,

I'll second what was said about additives being almost a religion as are engine oils and tractor brands.

Being newer, your 1 series doesn't need a lot of additives as it's fuel system is designed to run without issue on ULSD. That being the case, I would suggest a high quality additive for winter use. You really don't need too much else. Here are my suggestions to new Diesel owners.

1) Pick one reliable quality fuel supplier and stick with them. When you find a station that has good Diesel fuel turn over, stick with them, they will have less contamination of the fuel as it doesn't sit in the tank for months before you buy it.

2) Pick a wintertime fuel additive that meets the needs of your equipment and stick with it. I have used the same additive in all my Diesels for the last 24 years. That includes everything from a Deere 330 to large Cummins in our over-the-road trucks to off-road construction equipment.

3) If you buy in bulk, treat the fuel in the tank for every condition you operate in as you don't know when the fuel will be used. We buy our off-road fuel in 500 gallon drops, we treat for winter temps year round as we don't know what temps that fuel will see when it's in the tanks of the equipment.

4) Filter the fuel. If your filling with a funnel, drop a paint cone filter into the funnel and pour the fuel through it. The filter will catch small bits and more importantly, it will tell you instantly if you have "black snot" or bacteria/algae contamination as it will plug. If you encounter that, STOP filling your tank and go get some bactracide treatment and treat every container of Diesel you have including all equipment. (You should tell your supplier if you just purchased fuel as they may be the source of the contamination that would impact other users, they will appreciate the call so they can test on their own as they don't need the headache of replacing large orders of contaminated fuel)

5) Keep spare fuel filters for all your equipment on hand. In low temps, "gelling" can be reversed by getting the equipment to a warm place for a few hours then re-treating the fuel however, "clouding" of the fuel cannot be reversed without a "rescue" additive and filter replacement. Once the paraffin comes out of solution and solidifies, it won't return on it's own and must be dissolved with a special additive. The filters will plug solid with clouded fuel and even with soaking them in rescue additive won't completely clear them, it is very difficult to get the solidified paraffin out of filter media. (That method can be used to get the equipment back to a heated location but you shouldn't keep running those filters as they won't flow enough to supply the injector pump and may degrade/fail allowing contamination through and into the high pressure side which is very bad.

OK, that's enough typing, hope it helps,

Tom

PS, if you want to know the additive I use, PM me as I don't want to start a heated discussion in the thread as to brand names.
 

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Who knew?? I had no idea there was so much to know about additives. Now, I am a little concerned about the winter additive being to old that I put in. Anyway to know? I think it was purchased last year but may have been the year before. The additive for winter is the only one I have ever used, so far.
 
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