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Has anyone heard of these? This is my first year with my 1025R and thinking I might need chains. I was going to order the normal ones when I saw these. I like the idea they wont hurt the tires or driveway as much (or so they say) Little pricey but I don't mind if they do the job.

Hope someone on here has used them and can give us the good, bad and the ugly on them.

Thanks:greentractorride:

For superior traction year-round, TerraKing TerraGrips offer an exciting new alternative to steel tire chains. Rather than digging into the surface, strong rubber belts provide a firm grip, eliminating scratching, chipping, and general surface and tire wear. Perfect for use in any loose material, TerraGrips install quickly and easily, and are built to last. Try them today, and say goodbye to tire chains forever. Engineered and manufactured in the U.S.A. Sold as a set (set contains two TerraGrips). For sizing questions see sizing guide images 1 through 3.
Features:
Improved traction in all conditions: snow, mud, mulch, gravel, and more
Rubber slats provide superior grip and protect driving surface against damage
Rubber offers exceptional durability and prevents additional tire wear caused by steel chains
Easy, no-tools installation
Plated steel components resist rust; Made in the U.S.A
Product Details:
Product Dimensions: 18 x 6.7 x 6.7 inches
Item Weight: 11.2 pounds
Shipping Weight: 11.2 pounds
Manufacturer: Superior Tech, Inc
Item model number: ST90008
 

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From what I have read on other forums they work very well but that's on garden tractors.With R4 tires you need some thing the tire is hard compound witch makes traction tough in the cold.
 
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Seen people with them on lawn/garden tractors. I think the largest size they make will fit the 1-series tractors I looked at them a few years back but they don't make them large enough for my machine. The biggest drawback with them is that they won't do anything for you on ice.
 

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There are various companies that make rubber tire chains. My brother uses them on the rear of his Ford 1210 which has 29x12.00-15 R3 tires. They seem to work okay on his level paved driveway. He has had to replace a few of the rubber cross links over the years as they tear.

If you are concerned about damage to a paved or concrete driveway they are a good alternative to chains.


www.tirechain.com sells rubber tire chains.
 

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Has anyone heard of these? This is my first year with my 1025R and thinking I might need chains. I was going to order the normal ones when I saw these. I like the idea they wont hurt the tires or driveway as much (or so they say) Little pricey but I don't mind if they do the job.

Hope someone on here has used them and can give us the good, bad and the ugly on them.

Thanks:greentractorride:

For superior traction year-round, TerraKing TerraGrips offer an exciting new alternative to steel tire chains. Rather than digging into the surface, strong rubber belts provide a firm grip, eliminating scratching, chipping, and general surface and tire wear. Perfect for use in any loose material, TerraGrips install quickly and easily, and are built to last. Try them today, and say goodbye to tire chains forever. Engineered and manufactured in the U.S.A. Sold as a set (set contains two TerraGrips). For sizing questions see sizing guide images 1 through 3.
Features:
Improved traction in all conditions: snow, mud, mulch, gravel, and more
Rubber slats provide superior grip and protect driving surface against damage
Rubber offers exceptional durability and prevents additional tire wear caused by steel chains
Easy, no-tools installation
Plated steel components resist rust; Made in the U.S.A
Product Details:
Product Dimensions: 18 x 6.7 x 6.7 inches
Item Weight: 11.2 pounds
Shipping Weight: 11.2 pounds
Manufacturer: Superior Tech, Inc
Item model number: ST90008
I have used the Terra Grips and they are certainly better than not having anything on the rear tires for traction.

As JimR said, they make a size which will fit the 1025R rear tires. Personally, here is exactly what I thought of the Terra Grips.

On a 1 to 10, with 1 being no benefit and 10 being perfect traction, I found the Terra grips to perform as follows;

On packed snow, about an 8.5 to a 9. They definitely helped with traction and made a difference. I plow several driveways which have a steep grade right from the road, in fact the one driveway has almost a 10 degree grade for about 100 feet and I have to push all of the snow UP the driveway as there is no place to pile it as the driveway is at the curve in the roadway. Keep in mind I was doing this plowing in all prior seasons with a 2 wheel drive tractor.

On a typical driveway road surface when the snow first falls, it is probably a 9 out of 10 as compared to steel tire chains.

On a combination of packed snow and icy spots, they provide about a 5 or 6 out of 10. Their weakness is on glare ice.

On sheer ice, they are no better than the bare tire themselves and would give them a 1 out of 10. I am talking the type of ice you can barely walk on without breaking your neck.

I used my Terra Grips for 3 season and I plow a LOT of snow, like a minimum of 2.5 to 3 hours of tractor use every time I plow snow. I had one bolt come out of a cross bar and I replaced it and I never had a problem after that. If you are concerned about scoring the driveway or damaging the surface, then I would suggest you give them a try. If you don't care about the surface, then steel chains are going to give you the most traction.

I can tell you the very best set of tire chains I have owned was the first set I bought 20 years ago and they were also the most expensive at a cost of about $140 from Deere at the time. But those chains lasted me at least 10 years and I then finally began having cross chain failures and that is clearly the time to replace them. Each set I have purchased since had lasted less and less.

The last season I ran tire chains, I bought a set from Oregon, the mower blade and maker of other mower and tractor accessories and they lasted about half the season before cross chain failure and then I bought a set from Deere and I think they actually may have come out of the same factory in China as did the chains I got from Oregon as they were packaged exactly the same even with the same product bar code labels and the similarities between the other packaging items were too close to be a coincidence. I guess the Deere dealer is able to get parts where ever they can and maybe they got the chains I bought from a source other than Deere or maybe that is where Deere gets these tire chains.

I can tell you on a traditional chain set, once a cross chain breaks, trying to fix them with "cross link repair kits" and other approaches are a band aid at best. It got so bad I would carry a bundle of zip ties on my tractor so I could zip tie the broken cross chains so they wouldn't beat the underside of the fender and everything else they come in contact with. After repairing the cross chains with dedicated "Cross chain repair links" proved to be a failure, I just take a set of bolt cutters and cut the cross chain out completely.

In terms of product "reliability", I can tell you that I have had far more issues with metal chains than I ever did with the Terra Grips in terms of product failures and having to lay on the ground and zip tie cross links or cut them off with the bolt cutters once back in the garage. I had the one bolt come out of the Terra Grips and once I repaired it, there were no other issues. I think it just wasn't tight from the factory. I have worn my Terra Grips quite a bit. In fact, I am going to go out and take a picture of them so you can see and I will post it below.

A lot of what will work best for year is based upon the surface you are plowing and the weight on your tractor. Since I plow between 12 and 15 driveways and as much as 1/2 mile of private paved roads every time I plow, I don't want to be dealing with cross link failures. The Terra Grips sure fit the tire more snugly and I used a special tightener in the center of the Terra Grips to draw them tight and I never had an issue in 3 years.

I have about 900 pounds on the rear of my tractor this winter with the new cab, the carry all on the 3 point and the weight on the carry all. I am going to try to plow with the tractor in 4wd without any chains or terra grips and see how it does. If I need more traction, I will add the terra grips I have first, simply to avoid the B.S. issues I have experienced with chains.

Keep in mind that last winter was a very light plow season for me and I plowed almost 50 hours of tractor time. If we have a heavy snow season, I could be putting as much as 200 hours or more on my tractor just for snow removal duties so I really use either the tire chains or the Terra Grips on my machine.........

Hope this is helpful. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions or if I can help you in any way. :good2:

Picture of the two Terra Grips. I would bet these have been used at least 150 hours and maybe as much as 300 hours.......To give you an idea of the wear on the rubber straps.
IMG_20171107_143238392.jpg


A close up look at the actual rubber. They are showing wear but far from being "worn through".
IMG_20171107_143248186.jpg

You can see the difference in the thickness of the straps in the non road contact area of the side wall fastener and that of the actual road wear surface, but I can tell you that my experience lately has been I would have worn through at least 2 sets of tire chains in the same time of use which I had these Terra Grips in use on the 2wd tractor.

I just noticed when looking at the pictures that I happened to photo the one cross strap which I had to put the repair bolt in. Clearly, I have the extra bolt length protruding from the side of the tire as if the bolt was reversed, it would be putting pressure on the sidewall. This is the one I had to fix and it was very early on in my use of these. Since that time, I have not had any other issues with straps coming loose or other failures.

You would really have to use these to wear through the rubber straps. Also, these were on my 455 which is 2wd and I can tell you, I plowed hard with that machine and didn't take it easy on tire spin, etc. Also, I was pushing a plow which is 7' 3" wide and piling snow, so I was putting a lot of pressure on these straps from a traction perspective.

IMG_20171107_143256686.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you!

I have used the Terra Grips and they are certainly better than not having anything on the rear tires for traction.

As JimR said, they make a size which will fit the 1025R rear tires. Personally, here is exactly what I thought of the Terra Grips.

On a 1 to 10, with 1 being no benefit and 10 being perfect traction, I found the Terra grips to perform as follows;

On packed snow, about an 8.5 to a 9. They definitely helped with traction and made a difference. I plow several driveways which have a steep grade right from the road, in fact the one driveway has almost a 10 degree grade for about 100 feet and I have to push all of the snow UP the driveway as there is no place to pile it as the driveway is at the curve in the roadway. Keep in mind I was doing this plowing in all prior seasons with a 2 wheel drive tractor.

On a typical driveway road surface when the snow first falls, it is probably a 9 out of 10 as compared to steel tire chains.

On a combination of packed snow and icy spots, they provide about a 5 or 6 out of 10. Their weakness is on glare ice.

On sheer ice, they are no better than the bare tire themselves and would give them a 1 out of 10. I am talking the type of ice you can barely walk on without breaking your neck.

I used my Terra Grips for 3 season and I plow a LOT of snow, like a minimum of 2.5 to 3 hours of tractor use every time I plow snow. I had one bolt come out of a cross bar and I replaced it and I never had a problem after that. If you are concerned about scoring the driveway or damaging the surface, then I would suggest you give them a try. If you don't care about the surface, then steel chains are going to give you the most traction.

I can tell you the very best set of tire chains I have owned was the first set I bought 20 years ago and they were also the most expensive at a cost of about $140 from Deere at the time. But those chains lasted me at least 10 years and I then finally began having cross chain failures and that is clearly the time to replace them. Each set I have purchased since had lasted less and less.

The last season I ran tire chains, I bought a set from Oregon, the mower blade and maker of other mower and tractor accessories and they lasted about half the season before cross chain failure and then I bought a set from Deere and I think they actually may have come out of the same factory in China as did the chains I got from Oregon as they were packaged exactly the same even with the same product bar code labels and the similarities between the other packaging items were too close to be a coincidence. I guess the Deere dealer is able to get parts where ever they can and maybe they got the chains I bought from a source other than Deere or maybe that is where Deere gets these tire chains.

I can tell you on a traditional chain set, once a cross chain breaks, trying to fix them with "cross link repair kits" and other approaches are a band aid at best. It got so bad I would carry a bundle of zip ties on my tractor so I could zip tie the broken cross chains so they wouldn't beat the underside of the fender and everything else they come in contact with. After repairing the cross chains with dedicated "Cross chain repair links" proved to be a failure, I just take a set of bolt cutters and cut the cross chain out completely.

In terms of product "reliability", I can tell you that I have had far more issues with metal chains than I ever did with the Terra Grips in terms of product failures and having to lay on the ground and zip tie cross links or cut them off with the bolt cutters once back in the garage. I had the one bolt come out of the Terra Grips and once I repaired it, there were no other issues. I think it just wasn't tight from the factory. I have worn my Terra Grips quite a bit. In fact, I am going to go out and take a picture of them so you can see and I will post it below.

A lot of what will work best for year is based upon the surface you are plowing and the weight on your tractor. Since I plow between 12 and 15 driveways and as much as 1/2 mile of private paved roads every time I plow, I don't want to be dealing with cross link failures. The Terra Grips sure fit the tire more snugly and I used a special tightener in the center of the Terra Grips to draw them tight and I never had an issue in 3 years.

I have about 900 pounds on the rear of my tractor this winter with the new cab, the carry all on the 3 point and the weight on the carry all. I am going to try to plow with the tractor in 4wd without any chains or terra grips and see how it does. If I need more traction, I will add the terra grips I have first, simply to avoid the B.S. issues I have experienced with chains.

Keep in mind that last winter was a very light plow season for me and I plowed almost 50 hours of tractor time. If we have a heavy snow season, I could be putting as much as 200 hours or more on my tractor just for snow removal duties so I really use either the tire chains or the Terra Grips on my machine.........

Hope this is helpful. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions or if I can help you in any way. :good2:

Picture of the two Terra Grips. I would bet these have been used at least 150 hours and maybe as much as 300 hours.......To give you an idea of the wear on the rubber straps.
View attachment 486066


A close up look at the actual rubber. They are showing wear but far from being "worn through".
View attachment 486074

You can see the difference in the thickness of the straps in the non road contact area of the side wall fastener and that of the actual road wear surface, but I can tell you that my experience lately has been I would have worn through at least 2 sets of tire chains in the same time of use which I had these Terra Grips in use on the 2wd tractor.

I just noticed when looking at the pictures that I happened to photo the one cross strap which I had to put the repair bolt in. Clearly, I have the extra bolt length protruding from the side of the tire as if the bolt was reversed, it would be putting pressure on the sidewall. This is the one I had to fix and it was very early on in my use of these. Since that time, I have not had any other issues with straps coming loose or other failures.

You would really have to use these to wear through the rubber straps. Also, these were on my 455 which is 2wd and I can tell you, I plowed hard with that machine and didn't take it easy on tire spin, etc. Also, I was pushing a plow which is 7' 3" wide and piling snow, so I was putting a lot of pressure on these straps from a traction perspective.

View attachment 486082
Thank you for taking the time to go into depth about the good and bad. It really helped me and I am sure others who read it will appreciate the time and effort you took to help out a guy with only :bigbeer:25hrs tractor time!
 

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I shopped JD traction belts before buying chains. Thought I read something about only using them with turf tires. Probably because turfs are pretty flat across the tread.

Do many people use them on off road tires?

How about adding studs or screws across the face of the cross belt? Should help on ice which is this systems down side.
 

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To each their own, IMO unless you spin your wheels while plowing snow, NO DAMAGE is done to your concrete ,asphalt or even a gravel driveway. Once your start to spin stop, backup and take a different approach.
I ideal of steel chain is to get a grip on ice or packed snow , they work.
 

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To each their own, IMO unless you spin your wheels while plowing snow, NO DAMAGE is done to your concrete ,asphalt or even a gravel driveway. Once your start to spin stop, backup and take a different approach.
I ideal of steel chain is to get a grip on ice or packed snow , they work.
Where is the fun in that? lol

Don't worry I'll be testing your theory at the in laws place this season. Last year I went tires only and needed more traction the one time we got dumped on. I know for sure that they don't want any marks on the blacktop. Heck they don't even want me to put salt down.
 

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To each their own, IMO unless you spin your wheels while plowing snow, NO DAMAGE is done to your concrete ,asphalt or even a gravel driveway. Once your start to spin stop, backup and take a different approach.
I ideal of steel chain is to get a grip on ice or packed snow , they work.
Some of the black top sealants used make a surface which is already much more slippery than concrete even more difficult. One neighbor has a concrete pad in front of the garage door and the parking area is concrete and the circular drive and the stretch from the road to the parking area is blacktop. I don't know what they use to seal their blacktop but it's nearly impossible to not spin the tires on it, even when using tire chains. The home owner used to plow with a pickup and he even commented about the traction challenges on the blacktop portions of his driveway.

Fortunately, there are only two or three of the driveways I plow are blacktop and it's a competition between them as which one has the least traction. It's clearly in the sealant they use because I don't have this traction issue with our neighborhood roads which I plow and they are new asphalt, just two years ago. Also, the more often the driveway is sealed, the worse the traction in the winter.

I give the companies who have begun making alternative traction sources credit for trying something new. Even on concrete, steel chains can cause rust spots on the driveway where they mar the surface even in non spinning use. When they spin, it's really noticeable. With more homes using colored concrete and even patterns in the concrete (some patterns also utilize colors) homeowners are investing a lot of money in their driveways and care about how they look.

We have one neighbor who had his concrete driveway inlayed with a road brick pattern and then colored to appear to be road brick. It looked so much like brick that when our neighborhood roads were resurfaced, the engineer inquired about how they were going to contain the road bricks where the drive meets the road surface during their removal of the road surface and new asphalt installed. They were very surprised to learn the entire driveway was actually concrete made to appear as individual bricks.

I have seen where some sipe their tires with a hot knife and one had photos on GTT where he had cut grooves in each of his front tires in the center of the raised section on each R4. It looked well done and he claimed it helped tremendously with traction. Whatever works..
 

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Some of the black top sealants used make a surface which is already much more slippery than concrete even more difficult. One neighbor has a concrete pad in front of the garage door and the parking area is concrete and the circular drive and the stretch from the road to the parking area is blacktop. I don't know what they use to seal their blacktop but it's nearly impossible to not spin the tires on it, even when using tire chains. The home owner used to plow with a pickup and he even commented about the traction challenges on the blacktop portions of his driveway.

Fortunately, there are only two or three of the driveways I plow are blacktop and it's a competition between them as which one has the least traction. It's clearly in the sealant they use because I don't have this traction issue with our neighborhood roads which I plow and they are new asphalt, just two years ago. Also, the more often the driveway is sealed, the worse the traction in the winter.

I give the companies who have begun making alternative traction sources credit for trying something new. Even on concrete, steel chains can cause rust spots on the driveway where they mar the surface even in non spinning use. When they spin, it's really noticeable. With more homes using colored concrete and even patterns in the concrete (some patterns also utilize colors) homeowners are investing a lot of money in their driveways and care about how they look.

We have one neighbor who had his concrete driveway inlayed with a road brick pattern and then colored to appear to be road brick. It looked so much like brick that when our neighborhood roads were resurfaced, the engineer inquired about how they were going to contain the road bricks where the drive meets the road surface during their removal of the road surface and new asphalt installed. They were very surprised to learn the entire driveway was actually concrete made to appear as individual bricks.

I have seen where some sipe their tires with a hot knife and one had photos on GTT where he had cut grooves in each of his front tires in the center of the raised section on each R4. It looked well done and he claimed it helped tremendously with traction. Whatever works..
Add 100# or more on the rear of the tractor ,should help with the spinning. Sil fathers driveway is asphalt he owned a 445 with Curtis cab and using a front 54" blade and chains. Up on the upper level part of his drive ,tractor would spin some:banghead: first time I went down his driveway I didn't think I would get turned around. :banghead: When I made it back to his garage, I went inside and started searching for anything to put on the back or inside the cab. Finally found a 50# bag of salt or something put it behind the seat went back down the driveway plowing ,turned around no problems. Before that winter was over I added another 50# ,I hardly ever spin a tire now wet or dry .
 

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To each their own, IMO unless you spin your wheels while plowing snow, NO DAMAGE is done to your concrete ,asphalt or even a gravel driveway. Once your start to spin stop, backup and take a different approach.
I ideal of steel chain is to get a grip on ice or packed snow , they work.
I agree 100%, my FIL has used chains on his Kabota every year for 14 years on his very long with an uphill blacktop driveway and has never caused any damage it. :good2:
 

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Where is the fun in that? lol

Don't worry I'll be testing your theory at the in laws place this season. Last year I went tires only and needed more traction the one time we got dumped on. I know for sure that they don't want any marks on the blacktop. Heck they don't even want me to put salt down.
I stopped using "road salt" many years ago on any driveways or sidewalks. I use other "snow melt" products which don't harm the concrete and more importantly, don't bother pet's feet and also don't result in the tracking of the salt residue into the house on the floors. I have found that while the snow melt is much more expensive (3 to 5 times the price of "rock salt") I can actually use far less of it to achieve the safety needed.

A couple of my neighbors are in their 80's and they have steep driveways to their mailboxes at the road. For One couple, I carry the plastic grocery bags on my tractor and I check their mail box and their paper box and I always put their mail and paper in a plastic bag and hang it on their front door knob so they can get it without stepping outside when they open their front door. I fear they will slip on their steep driveway so I always use the snow melt on their driveway every time I plow it and their front entrance steps. Since we walk our dogs everyday, even when it doesn't snow we hang their mail and paper on their front door to prevent them from having to traverse the hill just to be safe. They appreciate it.

Their driveway has a 10% grade to the road and their drive is right on the curve in the street so if there is ice on their drive or the road at the base of their drive they can slide right through the corner. They have a brick mailbox and it has been hit at least 3 times over the 20 years by others, once by the guy who used to plow their driveway. He was stuck in their yard as he had gotten off their driveway and he had hit their mailbox causing it to have to be completely rebuilt. He flagged me down and asked me to pull him out claiming he would have to wait 2 hours for a wrecker. I did pull his plow truck out with my Hummer. Turns out he never told the homeowner what he had done (including the damage) and when I mentioned it to the homeowner, that is when he asked me to begin plowing with my tractor and that's how this snow plowing for others with my tractor all started. Now it's turned into about 1 out of every 3 driveways in the neighborhood. In fact, I have 9 consecutive driveways in a row on our road.

As I mentioned in the prior post, with people using colored and patterned concrete, they don't want salt tearing up their surface. The snow melt stuff I use I get through the farm store where I get my animal feed for the critters. I usually will buy 500 lbs at a time for better pricing plus so I always have some on hand. We had an ice storm last year and I used all 500 pounds in one day where I normally will use 50 to a maximum of 100 pounds on the 12 to 15 drives I regularly plow.
 

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I stopped using "road salt" many years ago on any driveways or sidewalks. I use other "snow melt" products which don't harm the concrete and more importantly, don't bother pet's feet and also don't result in the tracking of the salt residue into the house on the floors. I have found that while the snow melt is much more expensive (3 to 5 times the price of "rock salt") I can actually use far less of it to achieve the safety needed.

A couple of my neighbors are in their 80's and they have steep driveways to their mailboxes at the road. For One couple, I carry the plastic grocery bags on my tractor and I check their mail box and their paper box and I always put their mail and paper in a plastic bag and hang it on their front door knob so they can get it without stepping outside when they open their front door. I fear they will slip on their steep driveway so I always use the snow melt on their driveway every time I plow it and their front entrance steps. Since we walk our dogs everyday, even when it doesn't snow we hang their mail and paper on their front door to prevent them from having to traverse the hill just to be safe. They appreciate it.

Their driveway has a 10% grade to the road and their drive is right on the curve in the street so if there is ice on their drive or the road at the base of their drive they can slide right through the corner. They have a brick mailbox and it has been hit at least 3 times over the 20 years by others, once by the guy who used to plow their driveway. He was stuck in their yard as he had gotten off their driveway and he had hit their mailbox causing it to have to be completely rebuilt. He flagged me down and asked me to pull him out claiming he would have to wait 2 hours for a wrecker. I did pull his plow truck out with my Hummer. Turns out he never told the homeowner what he had done (including the damage) and when I mentioned it to the homeowner, that is when he asked me to begin plowing with my tractor and that's how this snow plowing for others with my tractor all started. Now it's turned into about 1 out of every 3 driveways in the neighborhood. In fact, I have 9 consecutive driveways in a row on our road.

As I mentioned in the prior post, with people using colored and patterned concrete, they don't want salt tearing up their surface. The snow melt stuff I use I get through the farm store where I get my animal feed for the critters. I usually will buy 500 lbs at a time for better pricing plus so I always have some on hand. We had an ice storm last year and I used all 500 pounds in one day where I normally will use 50 to a maximum of 100 pounds on the 12 to 15 drives I regularly plow.
Yeah I always preferred the bags of coated salt. The stuff I used was named Magic Salt. They coat regular salt with a byproduct from distilling booze. I would pick up 1,000 lbs (20-50 lbs bags) in a shot from this dealer 45 minutes away. This was when I was working for the trailer hood. Plus they paid me by the hour to get it.

That salt did go a long way. Could pre treat that 70 unit park with 150 lbs. Plus it doesn't turn everything white.
 
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