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Was over at the neighbors yesterday and he was installing a wireless camera system in his new 4 horse slant(w living qtrs). This got me to thinking that would be a great addition to my trailer(s).

I'm researching through the interwebs, but wondering if anyone has installed any systems in their trailers, either horse or gooseneck.
I forgot to get the brand from him, so I'll ask him this weekend when I see him.

I know the system is wireless via a 2.xGHz transmitter. It came with 4 cameras and 1 7" monitor for the cab. He was installing 2 cameras on the rear outside of the trailer for backing up, 1 inside to watch the horses, and not sure where the 4th was going.
His camera's are fixed, but in quick searches I see some that are clamp on style that could be moved from trailer to trailer.
Trailer Eyes

Thoughts & experiences?

TIA

Zach
 

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Subscribing to this thread...:thumbup1gif:
 
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How does the wifi work? Do you need to create a wifi HotSpot with your phone or does the camera system create a wifi hot spot which our phone then connects to.
I'm assuming its wifi and not Bluetooth.....
 
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If my wife's old tablet hadn't puked, I intended to try a GoPro Hero Session (small cube camera) connected to the tablet via Bluetooth. I would have used a 12VDC USB power port to power the camera and tablet.

Much better resolution was my goal; but alas I couldn't resurrect the old Dell.
 

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I have the Trailer Eyes setup. One camera inside the horse trailer to monitor the livestock, and one inside but pointed at the road behind the trailer. In random order, here are my opinions about pros and cons.

The Trailer Eyes monitor is larger than most other trailer systems. Color is nice too. Its size can make it difficult to find a good place to mount it, though. It also needs its external antenna connected for the system to work. The cord to the antenna is probably close to 15 feet long, and serves as part of the reception system. They recommend not coiling it up. It is not interchangeable with the antennas for the cameras, they have different connectors. To get mine out of the way, I ran the cord from the front seat, snaked under the carpet and put the antenna itself as far back towards the trailer as it would go. Of course, that means I can't remove the monitor and use it elsewhere. Since one of the uses of the system is also for barn monitoring, I can't do that since the monitor antenna is pretty much fixed to the truck.

The monitor can be used with up to eight cameras. If you buy second, third, and such cameras, make sure you order ones that are set up as 1 through 8. If you just randomly order an additional camera, you might receive one that is the same as the one you already have, and you cannot re-program the cameras yourself. It is actually the individual antenna hooked up to each camera which defines the number of the camera, as all cameras are the same. The monitor has a button that switches sequentially through the cameras. Your initial camera is camera 1. If your added camera and its antenna is camera 8, you have to push the button 7 times and look at 6 blank screens along the way. There's no way to toggle back and forth between camera 1 and any other camera. You can only move forward one camera at a push. Also, there's no split screen function. You either monitor the horses, or you monitor the road behind the trailer.

The cameras are fixed focus, and in my experience have to be about 10 feet away to be able to see two horses standing side by side. Any closer, and you just see one horse's head. Each camera can be operated by battery (for about 2-3 hours maximum), or hard wired. Of course, hard wiring and fixed mounting means lack of ability to move the system from trailer to trailer, or trailer to barn. I'd really recommend fixed mounting. The plastic mounts are designed for round tubes, and even if you have a suitably placed round metal tube in your trailer, the camera will shake and vibrate like it's having DTs, and so will the picture on the monitor.

Each camera also has to be run with its own antenna, attached by a long cable. You'll need to find a way to keep the cable out of the way of your horses. The manufacturer recommends stuffing the excess cable between your window bars and screens - not particularly elegant, but the cable only comes in one length (very long) and cannot be shortened.

The biggest advantage to this system is that it operates at 5.8 GHz rather than the 2.4 of almost every other wireless monitoring system, backup camers, and unfortunately the bluetooth system incorporated into most navigation systems and hands-free cell phone systems. These 2.4 trailer cameras (I've had two different ones) look great when you first hook them up. Then, you start the truck engine the navigation system and bluetooth come on, and the picture on your monitor goes crazy with interference. That doesn't happen with the Trailer Eyes B2 system.
 
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