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No, but you should be able to figure it out with an ohm meter.
 
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I have it, I'll try to post it later after I take care of some business.
 
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I don't have a drawing to share, but here is the pinouts:

For the UP/Down Switch:
Black #1 is UP
Black #2 is Common
Gr/Yel is DOWN

The remaining to two Black wires are for the single momentary switch.

Reminder: The switches used are only rated for 0.1 amp, so you MUST use relays to operate solenoid valves, horns, or anything else
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So is the black #2 is the hot wire ? and the other two black wires to the momentary either one could be hot and then run to the relay? I plan to use the momentary for a horn

For the UP/Down Switch:
Black #1 is UP
Black #2 is Common
Gr/Yel is DOWN

The remaining to two Black wires are for the single momentary switch.
 

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I don't have a drawing to share, but here is the pinouts:

For the UP/Down Switch:
Black #1 is UP
Black #2 is Common
Gr/Yel is DOWN

The remaining to two Black wires are for the single momentary switch.

Reminder: The switches used are only rated for 0.1 amp, so you MUST use relays to operate solenoid valves, horns, or anything else
100mA? Wow... that is extremely low for switch contacts. Are they using a reed switch or something? Even using a relay you would need to be careful about the coil resistance so you didn't overload the switch contacts. I notice that most 12V automotive type relays sold do not list the coil current.

So what's the best way to ensure the relay coil itself won't burn the switch contacts?
 
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Discussion Starter #7
So would a 5 pin 30/40 amp 12-14 VDC relay be low enough coil amperage for the switch contacts ?
 

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100mA? Wow... that is extremely low for switch contacts. Are they using a reed switch or something? Even using a relay you would need to be careful about the coil resistance so you didn't overload the switch contacts. I notice that most 12V automotive type relays sold do not list the coil current.

So what's the best way to ensure the relay coil itself won't burn the switch contacts?
Energize the coil in line with a Digital Meter using the amp setting and see what the coil draws.
 

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Anyone know or have a wiring diagram for this JD control handle LVA13698 ?



Just looking at it I would think the Yellow is the Common to all the blacks and each direction on a switch will supply power/connection to one black wire at a time and could be read thru a OHM Meter? Others may be right but there should be a coding on the black wires number or something if used another way. I see the numbers now on the black wires. Missed them at first.
 

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So is the black #2 is the hot wire ? and the other two black wires to the momentary either one could be hot and then run to the relay? I plan to use the momentary for a horn
Correct.
 
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So would a 5 pin 30/40 amp 12-14 VDC relay be low enough coil amperage for the switch contacts ?
It should be fine, that's what we use.
 

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Energize the coil in line with a Digital Meter using the amp setting and see what the coil draws.
Yes, obviously that would work but you can't do that in the store before purchasing the relay. :)
 
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With a price of $ 198.73, John Deere should send a Tech to install it.........
 
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100mA? Wow... that is extremely low for switch contacts. Are they using a reed switch or something? Even using a relay you would need to be careful about the coil resistance so you didn't overload the switch contacts. I notice that most 12V automotive type relays sold do not list the coil current.

So what's the best way to ensure the relay coil itself won't burn the switch contacts?
To protect the switch contacts when energizing a relay, you need a TVS (transient voltage suppression) diode placed across the relay coil terminals. When the switch turns off and the electromagnetic field collapses in the relay coil, voltage transients occur which can damage the contact surfaces of the switch. The diode across the coil will prevent this.

Here's what the circuit looks like:

diodeforrelaycoiljpg.jpg

Here's an example on Amazon of a diode you could use: LINK
 

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Buying a Relay

When buying a relay, frequently the manufacturer specifies the coil resistance instead of the coil current. You can use ohms law to calculate the current if you have the resistance. You don't need to measure it with a meter before buying it.

Since V = I X R (where V is voltage, I is current, and R is resistance)

I = V / R . The voltage is 12 V in the tractor. Divide 12 by the resistance and you'll have the current.
 
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When buying a relay, frequently the manufacturer specifies the coil resistance instead of the coil current. You can use ohms law to calculate the current if you have the resistance. You don't need to measure it with a meter before buying it.

Since V = I X R (where V is voltage, I is current, and R is resistance)

I = V / R . The voltage is 12 V in the tractor. Divide 12 by the resistance and you'll have the current.
I'm familiar with ohms law and that's what I figured too. But I checked a whole selection of relays at NAPA, Grainger and a few other on-line sources and didn't find anyone who listed the coil resistance.
 
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To protect the switch contacts when energizing a relay, you need a TVS (transient voltage suppression) diode placed across the relay coil terminals. When the switch turns off and the electromagnetic field collapses in the relay coil, voltage transients occur which can damage the contact surfaces of the switch. The diode across the coil will prevent this.

Here's what the circuit looks like:



Here's an example on Amazon of a diode you could use: LINK
Ray, it's my understanding that many relays now include a TVS or "flyback" diode internally, have you seen or heard this?
 
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Ray, it's my understanding that many relays now include a TVS or "flyback" diode internally, have you seen or heard this?
Here are pictures of both types. So I guess you could say, some relays do have diode filters and some do not. I personally like to buy relays with internal diode filtering.
 

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I'm familiar with ohms law and that's what I figured too. But I checked a whole selection of relays at NAPA, Grainger and a few other on-line sources and didn't find anyone who listed the coil resistance.
I frequently find that items I review on-line for purchase have missing, inadequate, inaccurate, or confusing specifications. It seems to be common on Amazon, yet you know that they're just publishing what the sellers recommend. I've had to return a few items because of the specs, and I generally avoid the purchase if I can't get a clear enough picture in advance. Poor marketing leads to poor sales.
 
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I frequently find that items I review on-line for purchase have missing, inadequate, inaccurate, or confusing specifications. It seems to be common on Amazon, yet you know that they're just publishing what the sellers recommend. I've had to return a few items because of the specs, and I generally avoid the purchase if I can't get a clear enough picture in advance. Poor marketing leads to poor sales.
I agree... I shopped for relays at NAPA, Summit Racing, Mouser Electronics, Allied Electronics, Digi-Key, Grainger, etc. and the only place that listed the coil current or resistance was Digi-Key and Mouser.

I was just browsing 12V automotive relays and there were a LOT of them that were over 100mA. Mouser showed coil resistance and a lot of those were 68 ohms which at 12.6V would be 185mA. Which would be too much for the contacts on that JD control handle. I don't doubt Kenny's information but other than a magnetic reed switch, a dry switch with a current carrying limit of 100mA is very rare. I'm amazed that JD put such a fragile switch in that control handle.
 
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