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Discussion Starter #1
I know I've got a lot of random questions. Please bear with me. Would you tow your 1026r for 17 hours to help a friend for 3 days of work? Worth, cost... None of that matters, my friend needs help. The work to be done is loader work spreading mulch and gravel. Some light box blading with the gravel. I'm looking more at value, not cost.

Should I load her up and make the trip, or hop on a plane and rent an orange tractor when I get there? This is my budget that we are playing with, not my friends.

What do you think? Load it up, or rent when I get there?
 

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I know I've got a lot of random questions. Please bear with me. Would you tow your 1026r for 17 hours to help a friend for 3 days of work? Worth, cost... None of that matters, my friend needs help. The work to be done is loader work spreading mulch and gravel. Some light box blading with the gravel. I'm looking more at value, not cost.

Should I load her up and make the trip, or hop on a plane and rent an orange tractor when I get there? This is my budget that we are playing with, not my friends.

What do you think? Load it up, or rent when I get there?
Well, what would it cost to tow it those 17 hours and what would it cost to fly out and rent a tractor?

If the cost is close, I'd rather fly out and not deal with towing and the possibility of issues along the way.
 

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First off, good call helping your friend. :good2:


17 hours one way or round trip? If you're up for the drive time, and have an appropriate trailer/ chains/ etc to haul it then I would do that. You know your machine, what it's limits are and what it can accomplish. There's no guarantee what kind of shape a rental will be in if it's available, and then you have to try and rent all the attachments you need as well.
 

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Well, what would it cost to tow it those 17 hours and what would it cost to fly out and rent a tractor?

If the cost is close, I'd rather fly out and not deal with towing and the possibility of issues along the way.
^^^^^^^^

I second that!! If cost is even close, fly out and rent. Save wear and tear on you, your towing equipment and your tractor. I'd be inclined to fly out and rent, if cost was within 1k!
 

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Well, what would it cost to tow it those 17 hours and what would it cost to fly out and rent a tractor?

If the cost is close, I'd rather fly out and not deal with towing and the possibility of issues along the way.
Yea, what would it cost to tow those 17 or more hours , wear and tear on vehicle ,trailer ,all the meals, fuel. Possible breakdowns, worry of breakdowns.

Then cost of air fare, maybe a rental car or truck. Guessing friend will pick you up at airport. Then cost of rental tractor guessing they would deliver and pickup . Guessing you would be more relaxed flying . Have to consider if something breaks on your tractor while there the cost and time to get it repaired and then may have to rent something to finish his work.

Big ????? I never have been much for flying , not knowing cost of everything . I guessing I would rent a car , drive to location , rent the tractor and then return home. . No wear and tear on any of my personal items, guessing 1000-1100 miles either round trip or one way.
 

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Rent, things happen. If something happens to a rental go rent another one. It's the good will fact you are going to help. Would it matter what tractor you use.
 

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I must commend you for your willingness to help a friend in need. If more people understood this and did this once in a while, our world would be a better place. I help friends anytime I can. You never know when you may need help in return. I have plans to help a friend this weekend myself. The satisfaction you get from helping somebody who truly appreciates it is like nothing else.


I can't help you with your decision, there's just too much to consider not knowing all the details. I think you'll find the correct solution to help your friend no matter which method you choose. Your friend has a really good friend.:thumbup1gif:
 

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Where is your friend at?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks everyone. The trip is about 2,000 miles round trip. Georgia to new york. The math breaks down like this (heavy rounding upwards)...

2,000 miles, 13 mpg filly loaded, $4 a gallon = $615.
Stop in Philly and see friend. $80 parking for truck and trailer.
Buy 10 gallons of diesel for 3 days work. $4.50 a gallon. = $45.00
White Castle = $100.
34 hours of my drive time + tractor seat time + weekend time...There's really no way to put a price on this.
My Truck and trailer are about a year old. Just renewed my AAA membership and ordered $300 of new chain ended straps.

I estimate that it would cost me a thousand dollars. I know what you are thinking, and I'll have to be very restrained to keep the White Castle down to $100.

Flight $420 + rental car $360 + gas
I need to look, but my buddy is telling me that tractor rental is $360+ a day up there!!! What?

I want to have a pic of the 1026r on top of a New York mountain, but I'm not sure how this will stack up. I'll do something, not sure what yet.
 

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Sounds like quite the adventure. As others have said, you are a great friend.

If you like driving, and you have a good truck and trailer, I'd go for the road trip. But that is me, and I was raised by a truck driver.

Check your wheel bearings before you leave. Make sure you have a good spare. Load her up and put it in the wind.

If you need anything along the way, let us know.
 

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I must commend you for your willingness to help a friend in need. If more people understood this and did this once in a while, our world would be a better place. I help friends anytime I can. You never know when you may need help in return. I have plans to help a friend this weekend myself. The satisfaction you get from helping somebody who truly appreciates it is like nothing else.


I can't help you with your decision, there's just too much to consider not knowing all the details. I think you'll find the correct solution to help your friend no matter which method you choose. Your friend has a really good friend.:thumbup1gif:
Helping people you don't even know is the icing, AKA Cat's A**
 

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If you need anything along the way, let us know.
:thumbup1gif: GOOD IDEA!

Bubber, Don't know where in NY you're going but if you want my phone number in case of a "now what situation", PM me.
For the record, I'd sell it to diesel.:lol:
 

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I would say that your friend is indeed lucky to have you as a friend. Be sure to check (a) your insurance to make sure you are completely covered if you have a blowout and a rollover, or other unfortunate incident, and (b) your trailer and tag are legal in NY. Good luck!

Toy Story - Intro Song - "You've Got a Friend in Me" - YouTube
 

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I think the numbers are close enough that there isn't a clear advantage to flying/renting. I'm probably going to give the nod to driving/hauling. Rentals of skids steers/tractors aren't cheap and your quoted numbers are similar to what I would pay here.
There are a couple of advantages to hauling and using your tractor:
1) Looking back, the fact that you drove and hauled your tractor to do the work embraces the friendship in a way that flying/renting doesn't.
2) If the job takes longer, (when doesn't that happen) the rental could really get of control.
3) Just like "Flat Stanley" your tractor will have a story to tell the other tractors.
4) Hey....it's an adventure.
5) You are going to another place with a TRAILER! There will be stuff for sale along the road! Need I say more!

Last year my friend bought an under ground storm shelter in Alabama, and we used my trailer to go get it. We put new wheel bearing and brakes on before we left, perhaps an unnecessary step compared to but they appeared marginal and I had his help doing it. It was a great trip and I would do it again. You can't go wrong helping a friend, and the memories are priceless and the effort always elevates the friendship to a new level.

Hook 'er up and have a great trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for the feedback. I like the part that ndrmyr brought up where there will be stuff for sale on the way. I can't imagine how many deere dealers, farm supply stores and what not that I'll pass. I thought I could go through SC and have another friend shadow me, but he wants to drive through the night. I'm not good at that. Exhaustion is something that I'm concerned about. Pulling a trailer, if you don't do it for a living is more work than just pointing the truck down the road.

So, what do I need to look for to make sure I'm legal in NY as 2LaneCruzer pointed out? I found this page: New York - Other Types of Vehicles - Registration Steps With The NY DMV at DMV.org: The DMV Made Simple and it doesn't really say anything that helps out on this.

I'll have the tractor strapped at all 4 corners. A strap across the loader arms, one across the box blade in the bucket and one across the RC2048. Two spare straps in the truck.
 

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New York State Department of Motor Vehicles
Division of Vehicle Safety Services
EQUIPMENT REQUIRED FOR TRAILERS
REQUIRED LIGHTING
All devices must be of a type approved by the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles.
DEVICES & REFLECTORS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A combination lighting unit may be used to satisfy more than one purpose.
ITEM NUMBER
REQUIRED
LOCATION
(Heights specified are measured in inches from road surface to center of item).
Red Tail Lamps 2 Rear - One each side, at the same height (not less than 15” nor more than
72”), and as far apart as practicable.
Red Stop Lamps 2 Rear - Same as tail lamp above.
White Number Plate Lamp 1 Rear - Located to illuminate registration number plate from top or side.
Red Reflex Reflectors* 2 Rear - One each side of the vertical centerline, as far apart as practicable.
2 Sides- As far to the rear as practicable.
Amber Reflex Reflectors* 2 Sides- As far to the front as practicable.
2 Sides- At or near the center, only on vehicles 30 feet or more in length.
Red Side Marker Lamps** 2 Sides- As far to the rear as practicable.
Amber Side Marker Lamps** 2 Sides- As far to the front as practicable.
2 Sides- At or near the midpoint, only on vehicles 30 feet or more in length.
Red or Amber Turn Signal Lamps 2 Rear- As far apart as possible, not less than 15” or more than 83” high.
Identification Lamp (3 lamp cluster) 1 Rear- As close as practicable to the top of vehicle at vertical centerline.
for vehicles 80” or more in width Lamp centers should be spaced not less than 6” or more than 12”
(including wheels) apart.
Red Clearance Lamps for vehicles 80” 2 Rear- As near to top and as far apart as practicable.
or more in width (including wheels)
Amber Clearance Lamps for vehicles 80” 2 Front- As near to top and as far apart as practicable.
or more in width (including wheels)
* Note: Red and amber reflex reflectors should be mounted at same height, not less than 15” nor more than 60” high.
**Note: Red and amber side marker lamps should be mounted at same height, not less than 15” nor more than 60” high.
HAZARD WARNING.......................... 1966 and newer trailers must have two rear turn signal lamps that operate in conjunctio
n with the towing
vehicle hazard warning system.
SPLASH GUARDS.............................. T
railers towed by commercial vehicles must be constructed or equipped with splash gu
ards to prevent
water or other road surface substances from being thrown by the rearmost wheels beyond the extreme rear
of the trailer, and to minimize side spray.
TRAILER ATTACHMENT.................. Every trailer must be attached to prevent its wheels from being deflected more than six inc
hes from the
path of the towing vehicle’s wheels.
Every trailer, except semi-trailers, must be attached to the towing vehicle by a device, including safety
chains, of a type approved by the Commissioner.
TIRES .................................................. Trailers must be equipped with tires in safe operating condition. A tire
is deemed to be in unsafe operating
condition if there is a visual break, a cut in excess of one inch, a bump, a bulge, ply or cord exposure, tread
design completely worn or tread depth (when measured with a tire gauge) is less than 2/32 of an inch.
BRAKES .............................................. Trailers weighing over 1,000 pounds unladen, and trailers having a maximum
gross weight in excess of
3,000 pounds, must be equipped with brakes.
Brakes must be adequate to control the vehicle at all times, be in good working order and must comply
with the standards set by the Commissioner for brake efficiency.
Commercially used trailers must have an emergency breakaway system, which will hold the trailer
stationary for at least 15 minutes


http://dmv.ny.gov/forms/cr79.pdf
 

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New York State Department of Motor Vehicles
Division of Vehicle Safety Services
EQUIPMENT REQUIRED FOR TRAILERS
REQUIRED LIGHTING
All devices must be of a type approved by the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles.
DEVICES & REFLECTORS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A combination lighting unit may be used to satisfy more than one purpose.
ITEM NUMBER
REQUIRED
LOCATION
(Heights specified are measured in inches from road surface to center of item).
Red Tail Lamps 2 Rear - One each side, at the same height (not less than 15” nor more than
72”), and as far apart as practicable.
Red Stop Lamps 2 Rear - Same as tail lamp above.
White Number Plate Lamp 1 Rear - Located to illuminate registration number plate from top or side.
Red Reflex Reflectors* 2 Rear - One each side of the vertical centerline, as far apart as practicable.
2 Sides- As far to the rear as practicable.
Amber Reflex Reflectors* 2 Sides- As far to the front as practicable.
2 Sides- At or near the center, only on vehicles 30 feet or more in length.
Red Side Marker Lamps** 2 Sides- As far to the rear as practicable.
Amber Side Marker Lamps** 2 Sides- As far to the front as practicable.
2 Sides- At or near the midpoint, only on vehicles 30 feet or more in length.
Red or Amber Turn Signal Lamps 2 Rear- As far apart as possible, not less than 15” or more than 83” high.
Identification Lamp (3 lamp cluster) 1 Rear- As close as practicable to the top of vehicle at vertical centerline.
for vehicles 80” or more in width Lamp centers should be spaced not less than 6” or more than 12”
(including wheels) apart.
Red Clearance Lamps for vehicles 80” 2 Rear- As near to top and as far apart as practicable.
or more in width (including wheels)
Amber Clearance Lamps for vehicles 80” 2 Front- As near to top and as far apart as practicable.
or more in width (including wheels)
* Note: Red and amber reflex reflectors should be mounted at same height, not less than 15” nor more than 60” high.
**Note: Red and amber side marker lamps should be mounted at same height, not less than 15” nor more than 60” high.
HAZARD WARNING.......................... 1966 and newer trailers must have two rear turn signal lamps that operate in conjunctio
n with the towing
vehicle hazard warning system.
SPLASH GUARDS.............................. T
railers towed by commercial vehicles must be constructed or equipped with splash gu
ards to prevent
water or other road surface substances from being thrown by the rearmost wheels beyond the extreme rear
of the trailer, and to minimize side spray.
TRAILER ATTACHMENT.................. Every trailer must be attached to prevent its wheels from being deflected more than six inc
hes from the
path of the towing vehicle’s wheels.
Every trailer, except semi-trailers, must be attached to the towing vehicle by a device, including safety
chains, of a type approved by the Commissioner.
TIRES .................................................. Trailers must be equipped with tires in safe operating condition. A tire
is deemed to be in unsafe operating
condition if there is a visual break, a cut in excess of one inch, a bump, a bulge, ply or cord exposure, tread
design completely worn or tread depth (when measured with a tire gauge) is less than 2/32 of an inch.
BRAKES .............................................. Trailers weighing over 1,000 pounds unladen, and trailers having a maximum
gross weight in excess of
3,000 pounds, must be equipped with brakes.
Brakes must be adequate to control the vehicle at all times, be in good working order and must comply
with the standards set by the Commissioner for brake efficiency.
Commercially used trailers must have an emergency breakaway system, which will hold the trailer
stationary for at least 15 minutes


http://dmv.ny.gov/forms/cr79.pdf
More regulations, just another reason to stay out of NY.

I would trailer and drive. I enjoy road trips and if you have a good friend to go along it makes that much better. I do however prefer the 4 legged model to the chatty 2 legged model.
 

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If you have anything on the side of your truck that resembles advertising, I'd take it off. Sometimes the DOT has issues with some of these, even for NY licensed people.
 

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I would say that your friend is indeed lucky to have you as a friend. Be sure to check (a) your insurance to make sure you are completely covered if you have a blowout and a rollover, or other unfortunate incident, and (b) your trailer and tag are legal in NY. Good luck!

Toy Story - Intro Song - "You've Got a Friend in Me" - YouTube

Very good input regarding the insurance. My homeowners insurance covers me, but they wanted to know if I would be using it for pay and if so, they would not cover me. A trip like this needs to be checked out with your insurance company just to make sure you are covered. The longer the trip, the higher your risk factor. Did your hear about the family that was told that most accidents happen within 7 miles from home, so they moved.

Tractors are expensive. I see your biggest problem is the higher risk factor with the long trip. Working the tractor after you get there is not likely a problem. If you make sure you have all your ducks in a row, go for it. Call it an adventure and have some fun. Take along a passenger to make the trip more fun. I would want my friend to pay my gas for the trip, but otherwise I would make the trip just for fun and friendship bonding. Anytime I feel a friend would return favors for me, I would go out of my way to help them.

Dave
 
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