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Hello All,

I have an X475 and the battery isn't charging. It takes about a week of use before it gets run down enough to need to be recharged for another week of work. It appears there is no alternator like a car which would be my suspicion as the fault. First, what do you believe would be the problem, and secondly, is it fixable by a guy with basic mechanic skills?

Thanks in advance. I appreciate y'alls help.
 

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Hello All,

I have an X475 and the battery isn't charging. It takes about a week of use before it gets run down enough to need to be recharged for another week of work. It appears there is no alternator like a car which would be my suspicion as the fault. First, what do you believe would be the problem, and secondly, is it fixable by a guy with basic mechanic skills?

Thanks in advance. I appreciate y'alls help.

If you have access to a multi meter you should be able to diagnose the problem. Fully charge the battery and let it sit a few hours to overnight. You want to give the battery time to stabilize. You should have 12.7 volts minimum.
Turn the key on and check the voltage reading. Then start the engine watching the meter. It should not drop below 10.5 volts.
Then check the reading with the engine running. You should have 13.7-14.5 volts. If the reading is below this you have a charging problem.
Check it out and let us know what you find. I'll explain how to do further testing if needed.
 

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Thank you, I charged it overnight but can't figure out which setting on the multimeter will give me the volt reading.
 

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I think I figured out the multimeter and got 12.4 with the engine off, 12.2 with the ignition key turned on and 12.2 with it running.
 

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I think I figured out the multimeter and got 12.4 with the engine off, 12.2 with the ignition key turned on and 12.2 with it running.
You want direct current volts.

Battery reading a little weak. A good charged battery should be over 12.6.

Looks like it's not charging. Next step would be figuring out if the alternator is putting out AC voltage. Unplug the voltage regulator and check the wires coming out of the engine. The faster the engine runs the more voltage you should get. You can probably find a video on YouTube of how to do this if you're not familiar.
 

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Still working on locating the regulator so I can test it.....
You can't really test the regulator. You have to check everything else out. It should be a square or rectangular box attached to the engine case someplace. A lot of them only have one bolt holding it on. Usually in the middle of the part. They usually have 3 wires with 2 plugs. The stator (windings) is usually under or next to the flywheel. The magnets will be attached to said flywheel. The stator winding has 2 wires that will run out of the engine cover around the flywheel area. The 2 wires usually go into the same plastic plug. The plugs other end will lead to the regulator. The 3rd single wire will run from the regulator to the battery or fuse box.

The single plug with 2 wires is the one you want. Unplug the connection. Set the voltage meter to the alternating current sacle. Then probe the 2 wires coming out of the engine. It doesn't matter what probe goes to what wire. Then start the engine. The faster it runs the more voltage you should get. If you get voltage the regulator is most likely bad.

You can also set your meter to ohms = resistance. When you touch the probes together it should read zero. Put one probe against the engine case and the other to one of the 2 wires coming from the stator/engine. Then check the other wire. The meter should show an open or no resistance. You want to do this test with the engine off. If your meter shows zero or resistance the stator winding is grounded. Then your stator it's toast.

Note some regulators have cooling fins made onto the parts. Similar to a cylinder head, stereo amp. or computer power supply.
 
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