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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, my father in law is back in town and was running around doing some work in the yard with my X585 and he came down to tell me it is dead in the front yard. Of course this time of year I have the FEL on so it is going to be a PITA to try and work on it. Oh well...

I hopped on it and when I turn on the ignition the dash lights come on but all is quiet. No priming of the fuel pump so my guess is the issue is going to be back there somewhere. I did a quick check pulling the fuses and checking them with an ohm meter and they all tested good (out of the socket). I might have missed a fuse or two. I do have the TM so I will crack that open tonight and start running down the checklist for no Fuel Pump.

I should mention that I did notice something off a while back but I wasn't using the X very much lately. It was starting fine and if I hopped on and was just using it everything was great. But if I had to get off and set the parking brake with the engine running, when I got back on the machine and removed the parking brake while sitting in the seat, the engine would stumble for a split second and the warning light would flash a code 22. (two long two short).

I had posted about this problem a long time ago and the dash rebuild seemed to fix it for me or at least it went away but is back.

This is what code 22 means.
EFI module air/fuel pressure calculation error. To reset: Stop
engine, wait for fault indicator light to go off and fuel pump to
stop (approximately 0.5 to 1 second). Start engine.
Restarting clears the light but as soon as I set the parking brake and clear it, it does it again.

Brake switch starting to go out maybe? Though if set it does keep running. Same for the seat switch, I don't think it is that because it does run without it. The only safety that has been messed with is the RIO. I disabled the backup switch.

I will review the manual first but I am thinking, pull the seat, pull the rear fenders and see if I have power to the fuel pump. Maybe the fuel pump failed. Doesn't explain the 22 code but would explain why I can't hear the pump prime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Oh and other common stuff. I just did the home maintenance kit a couple months ago. Maybe 2hrs on the clock since new plugs, fuel filter, air filter, oil change and such.

It cranks fine, just without any indication of the fuel pump running I doubt it is getting fuel. If I can get the hood up high enough I can check the fuel pressure at the rail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did look things over when I was testing the fuses. On the right side of the machine there is a 10A fuse that tested good but I saw chafing on the wire. It looked like the wire got pinched between the frame and that side cover and I could see copper exposed. I wasn't sure what this fuse feeds but it tested good with the ohm meter. The wire is red on each side and I checked the wiring schematic really quick. This might be the issue.





F7 is a 10A fuse with red wires. Matches what I saw. That pink trace starts at the stud on the starter has the F6 Fusable Link and then on to the F7 fuse. From there it goes on to the load side of K12 EFI Module Power Relay and then on to K13 Fuel Pump Relay. Of course that would then go on to the fuel pump.

It doesn't explain my 22 code but it would explain that if the K12 Relay and then K13 Relay don't have power from F7 that the fuel pump won't prime.

Now F7 tested good on the ohm meter but the chafing might be on the starter motor side of that wire meaning the F6 Fusable Link might have done its job and prevented catching the tractor on fire.

I will dig into it after work but first test is to check for 12V at F7. I can get to that with the service panel I already have off. If it is that I might need to bypass the Fusable link for now injecting power into the other side of F7 to get the fuel pump running so I can cycle the FEL and get that off the machine. Then I can get to rewiring this line.

I have never blown a fusible link before. Can they be order from Deere or is it part of the harness? Of course this is speculation on limited data at this point. I did see the chafing and made a mental note of I have to fix that at a minimum and was surprised the fuse wasn't blown. I am not 100% sure this is F7 but the wire color matches up as does the fact that it is the only 10A fuse that I recall seeing. The others are 15A and 20A.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I did a quick parts lookup and it does appear that they make a kit to replace a fusible link. I would need to figure out what size it is I guess. Still a bit early in the process but as I sit here waiting for my next meeting to start I thought I would look.

 

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I had an X585 for 18 years with zero problems. Hope you get yours running right away.

rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If not available through JD, your local NAPA should have them - you would have to know the gauge though.
Yeah good thought on the Napa we have one in town. I first need to do a bit more diag work but it is easy to isolate and verify. It could also be one of those relays that let go.

I had an X585 for 18 years with zero problems. Hope you get yours running right away.

rob
Well I am pretty sure I will be able to figure it out. It didn't catch on fire and burn up. Though I mentioned to the wife that it was dead and she gave me a dirty look and said does this mean you get your 2025R before I get my kitchen???

Hmm wait a minute... yep it is dead....
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It's alive....

So I played my hunch on that chafed wire. Tested from F7 holder to ground and it was dead. I grabbed a chunk of 14 gauge stranded wire a couple blade spade connectors. Reached under the fender and popped the wire harness off the rocker switch for the 12V socket. Used the voltmeter to find positive and made a jumper from that connector into the other side of the F7 fuse holder. I tied off the wire to the grab handle and flipped the ignition on. The fuel pump came alive. Perfect!!! Gave it a turn and the machine fired right up.

I drove it around back to one of my other buildings and dropped the FEL so now I can actually work on it. Then around to the shop.

Now clearly this was just a field expedient temp fix to energize the relays and get the fuel pump running so that I could move the tractor as towing is a bad idea. As well as run the engine and hydraulics to drop the FEL. I did think of putting an inline fuse in my jumper but I didn't have a fuse holder handy. I could have made one but this was a quick and dirty fix so I skipped it. The 12V socket is protected by a 20A fuse and a separate fusible link worst case. I only needed to run it for a couple minutes to get from the front yard where it died around to the other building, drop the FEL and back up to the shop.

Interestingly I did get off with it running and the parking brake set. When I got back on to release the parking brake no 22 fault code and it kept running. I don't know for sure that these were related, maybe these fusible links are a slow blow situation. I am not sure.

Now with the hood off I disconnected the battery, disconnected the cables going to the starter and stripped away the heat shrink where the fusible link connects to that red wire. I then did a continuity check between the fusible link and the ring terminal and it was open. I then did a continuity check from the splice of the red wire and the fusible link to the F7 fuse holder and it tests good.

So now the plan is to replace the fusible link. Of the part numbers above it must be the 0.5mm AM116760. The TM and parts catalog doesn't really show any rating other than that. Being the fuse is a 10A, I would imagine if I went the NAPA route I could go with a 15A or so. I will have to dig into that. Maw Deere wants about $85 for it...

For reference I would imagine something like this would do the trick just fine and is probably available locally..

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Pull your air cleaner and look for crushed wires that go the the air sensor in the intake.
Easy enough to do. I did have my son do the home service kit. Maybe he was in a rush. Though the code went away when I did my temporary field repair. Seems strange but I can check that however it might be resolved once I get my fusible link replaced.
 

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Easy enough to do. I did have my son do the home service kit. Maybe he was in a rush. Though the code went away when I did my temporary field repair. Seems strange but I can check that however it might be resolved once I get my fusible link replaced.
That failure let me get a deal on my first 445
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here is the wire. You can see the pinch in the wire and the arrow is pointing to the bit of the frame where it is shiny and the wire was touching. It got hooked on the side access panel.

 
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Fusible link should be 2 gauges (or 4 numbers) smaller than the wire size it protects. So for a 16ga wire you would use a 20ga fusible link.
I think the 14ga fusible link (would protect a 10ga wire) is too big.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Fusible link should be 2 gauges (or 4 numbers) smaller than the wire size it protects. So for a 16ga wire you would use a 20ga fusible link.
I think the 14ga fusible link (would protect a 10ga wire) is too big.
Yeah that is the problem I am running into on this one. The smallest that NAPA or any other parts company seems to have is 18ga.

I have never had to mess with a fusible link before and I was trying to find info on what John Deere calls a 0.5mm fusible link and the best info I could find was that it is about a 20ga like you said.

I am getting closer but not quite there yet. I just hate spending $85 for a 4" bit of 20ga wire with a ring terminal. I might have to bite the bullet though as it is cheaper than a burned up tractor if this were to happen again.
 

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LX172, X720 with a 60D 7-Iron Deck, and a Kubota BX 25 TLB.
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25 feet of 20 gauge fusible link wire from Amazon for $13. Mexico made but shouldn't matter for this application.
Solder to the existing wire and heat shrink over the solder joint. Do not use a crimp style butt connector.
Solder the ring terminal on as well.
 

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Old school SAE terminology for wiring/fusible link size is traditional wire gauge sizes.
Two wire gauges size smaller for the wiring being protected sounds correct.
10 gauge wiring would use a 14 gauge fusible link.
12 gauge wiring would use a 16 gauge fusible link.
16 gauge wiring would use a 20 gauge fusible link.
Newer stuff (automobiles and apparently JD) uses squared millimeter terminology for wiring sizes.
You would need to know the diameter and use that pesky math to calculate the area of the cross section. (result in squared millimeters)
Sometimes when working with the metric wiring designations it won't fall on a particular SAE wire gauge size.
It's better to drop down a size (smaller diameter) of fusible link if that happens, vs burning up a vehicle/tractor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
25 feet of 20 gauge fusible link wire from Amazon for $13. Mexico made but shouldn't matter for this application.
Solder to the existing wire and heat shrink over the solder joint. Do not use a crimp style butt connector.
Solder the ring terminal on as well.
That was the best solution I could find as well. I was hoping to find something local but I ended up ordering that exact product about 45 minutes ago. It will be here Friday which isn't too bad I guess.

Yeah soldier and heat shrink is my normal go to on stuff like this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Old school SAE terminology for wiring/fusible link size is traditional wire gauge sizes.
Two wire gauges size smaller for the wiring being protected sounds correct.
10 gauge wiring would use a 14 gauge fusible link.
12 gauge wiring would use a 16 gauge fusible link.
16 gauge wiring would use a 20 gauge fusible link.
Newer stuff (automobiles and apparently JD) uses squared millimeter terminology for wiring sizes.
You would need to know the diameter and use that pesky math to calculate the area of the cross section. (result in squared millimeters)
Sometimes when working with the metric wiring designations it won't fall on a particular SAE wire gauge size.
It's better to drop down a size (smaller diameter) of fusible link if that happens, vs burning up a vehicle/tractor.
In another thread someone was complaining about how JD's parts search website used to label bolts with their size and grade. Then people would just run to their local hardware store to find a replacement. They recently pulled all that data down and just lists the bolt PN so now you have to go to a Deere dealer to get the $10 bolt and wait a week for your effort. Kind of like this $85 for a 4" chunk of 20ga wire with the ring terminals.

In my searching for that 0.5mm wire I did see some mention of it being 0.5mm2 so that is the cross section that you mention. I have no idea what the conversion would be. I do have a buddy that is a mechanical engineer that stopped over for a beer last night and we were talking about it. Somehow he did a conversion from that 0.5mm to something that was 20ga as the closest match as well. Not sure what he used as a conversion factor.

So the next question is what to do with the blown fusible link? There are three fusible links all on one ring terminal on the starter. So for the replacement one, I will use a new ring terminal like mentioned above. For the remaining ones they will be fine but I have a dead fusible link just laying around. I was thinking about trimming it a bit shorter. From where I have tested it there is no continuity to the ring terminal so I was thinking about trimming it to say 2" long, folding it back on itself and stuffing the entire thing (now about 1" long) in a bit of heat shrink then just let it dangle. I could trim it off somewhat flush but I was thinking there might be a little more risk in that in the event there is still continuity to the ring terminal. I would rather not mess with the other fusible links in that same ring terminal.
 

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Well I am pretty sure I will be able to figure it out. It didn't catch on fire and burn up. Though I mentioned to the wife that it was dead and she gave me a dirty look and said does this mean you get your 2025R before I get my kitchen???

Hmm wait a minute... yep it is dead....
"No honey, I won't be getting a 2025 before you get your kitchen" [as the new 2038R is unloaded in the driveway!] 😄 🤣

Good to see you've got it identified and have a solution in the works!
 
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In another thread someone was complaining about how JD's parts search website used to label bolts with their size and grade. Then people would just run to their local hardware store to find a replacement. They recently pulled all that data down and just lists the bolt PN so now you have to go to a Deere dealer to get the $10 bolt and wait a week for your effort. Kind of like this $85 for a 4" chunk of 20ga wire with the ring terminals.

In my searching for that 0.5mm wire I did see some mention of it being 0.5mm2 so that is the cross section that you mention. I have no idea what the conversion would be. I do have a buddy that is a mechanical engineer that stopped over for a beer last night and we were talking about it. Somehow he did a conversion from that 0.5mm to something that was 20ga as the closest match as well. Not sure what he used as a conversion factor.

So the next question is what to do with the blown fusible link? There are three fusible links all on one ring terminal on the starter. So for the replacement one, I will use a new ring terminal like mentioned above. For the remaining ones they will be fine but I have a dead fusible link just laying around. I was thinking about trimming it a bit shorter. From where I have tested it there is no continuity to the ring terminal so I was thinking about trimming it to say 2" long, folding it back on itself and stuffing the entire thing (now about 1" long) in a bit of heat shrink then just let it dangle. I could trim it off somewhat flush but I was thinking there might be a little more risk in that in the event there is still continuity to the ring terminal. I would rather not mess with the other fusible links in that same ring terminal.
The conversion: wire in mm2, work back from the area of a circle A="PIE"R2. Solve for R and double. That will give the diameter in mm, convert mm to inch and check a wire gauge chart for nearest size.
20 ga wire is .032" convert to mm = .812mm. convert to R ( 1/2 of .812) =.406 and solve for area =.518mm2
So 20ga is close enough.
 
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