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Hi all. This is my first post, so I hope I have it in the correct section! I have searched for other posts with the same issue, but haven't found any. I have a new x758 - just 6 hours on it. My concern is that when I am traveling at full speed, I have almost no power steering. The wheel is so hard to turn that I can't use the spinner knob. If I lift my foot off the pedal, I can steer with no effort. It feels to me that the hydraulic system isn't strong enough to keep up with both the transmission and the power steering. Has anyone else experienced this? I will be contacting the dealer, but thought maybe I could find some help here first. Thank you in advance!
 

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I looked on the internet and I found this. I hope it helps some but others will chime in too.


They are not really problematic, just misunderstood. Wonderful machines for flat lawns. I plan to buy one myself too - as they WILL be collectors items.

Go ahead and remove the fender deck so you can see what's going on with the actuators and switches. I'm going to guess that you've got a puntured/rotted/rat chewed actuator. They work off of engine vacuum, which is sent to the proper actuator via the switches at the rear of the machine, on the foot pedal linkage.

The transmission is actually quite simple in operation. It contains two hydros, but setup not how you think. One motor controls the forward/reverse, a smaller motor the steering. It steers by the smaller steering motor spinning a planetary drive around the differential. Hard to explain, but basically it can slow down each axle independantly by how fast or in what direction that smaller motor spins the planetarys. All that is internal to the trans. I doubt there is a problem inside the transmission.

They have all that "reverse logic" actuator stuff to make them steer like a normal tractor in forward or reverse. Twin stick ZTR's can be kind of weird to back up, so this system avoids that by basically flip-flopping the linkage when you go into reverse via the actuators.

I'd recommend getting the technical manual for it - it's great in terms of diagnostics and such. There is actually a diagnostic plug under the dash that you can probe with a test light to make sure all the switches are working correctly, but I can't remember how it works off the top of my head. It's in the tech manual though.

Have fun!
 

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Definetly check the fluid level in the transmission. The dipstick is under the seat.

Also what throttle position are you running at? Running around below half throttle will make the machine feel heavy because you aren't spinning the hydro pump fast enough.

To properly check the fluid the tractor should be cold and parked on a level surface. Unscrew the dipstick pull it out and wipe it, then stick it back in the transmission but don't screw it back in. Pull it back out and read the level.

If you aren't showing any fluid on the stick call the dealer and have them take care of it. Chances are it's only 1-2 qts low if it's low at all. That's a relatively small amount as there is at least 3.5 gallons of fluid in your hydro system.

The power steering should work just as easy at full speed as it does at low speed. I can travel, turn the wheel and raise my 3PH all at the same time and none of it feels heavy or slow.
 

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Definetly check the fluid level in the transmission. The dipstick is under the seat.

Also what throttle position are you running at? Running around below half throttle will make the machine feel heavy because you aren't spinning the hydro pump fast enough.

To properly check the fluid the tractor should be cold and parked on a level surface. Unscrew the dipstick pull it out and wipe it, then stick it back in the transmission but don't screw it back in. Pull it back out and read the level.

If you aren't showing any fluid on the stick call the dealer and have them take care of it. Chances are it's only 1-2 qts low if it's low at all. That's a relatively small amount as there is at least 3.5 gallons of fluid in your hydro system.

The power steering should work just as easy at full speed as it does at low speed. I can travel, turn the wheel and raise my 3PH all at the same time and none of it feels heavy or slow.

This first ^^^^^^^^^^^.

I had to add about a quart to mine.
 

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I looked on the internet and I found this. I hope it helps some but others will chime in too.


They are not really problematic, just misunderstood. Wonderful machines for flat lawns. I plan to buy one myself too - as they WILL be collectors items.

Go ahead and remove the fender deck so you can see what's going on with the actuators and switches. I'm going to guess that you've got a puntured/rotted/rat chewed actuator. They work off of engine vacuum, which is sent to the proper actuator via the switches at the rear of the machine, on the foot pedal linkage.

The transmission is actually quite simple in operation. It contains two hydros, but setup not how you think. One motor controls the forward/reverse, a smaller motor the steering. It steers by the smaller steering motor spinning a planetary drive around the differential. Hard to explain, but basically it can slow down each axle independantly by how fast or in what direction that smaller motor spins the planetarys. All that is internal to the trans. I doubt there is a problem inside the transmission.

They have all that "reverse logic" actuator stuff to make them steer like a normal tractor in forward or reverse. Twin stick ZTR's can be kind of weird to back up, so this system avoids that by basically flip-flopping the linkage when you go into reverse via the actuators.

I'd recommend getting the technical manual for it - it's great in terms of diagnostics and such. There is actually a diagnostic plug under the dash that you can probe with a test light to make sure all the switches are working correctly, but I can't remember how it works off the top of my head. It's in the tech manual though.

Have fun!
I think this description you posted above refers to a different series machine than the x758 lawn tractor.

I looked at the parts schematic for the x758 and I don't see some of the things that this description is referring to. Also, its mention of "Twin Stick ZTR's can be kind of weird to back up, so this system avoids that by basically flip flopping the linkage when you go into reverese via the actuators" sure doesn't seem to fit anything on this machine.

I don't recall seeing many diesel engine vacuum operated actuators anywhere on the x758 lawn tractor. Its using the similar design for the rear hydro and pump which has been in use for decades......with some upgrades. The steering uses the standard hydraulic cylinder which has been used for 35 years on larger, heavier duty Deere Lawn and Garden Tractors with power steering....

My guess would be a fluid level issue. I certainly doubt its anything serious.

The owner of the machine needs to be shown how to properly check the hydro oil in their machine as its very important for machine longevity and successful operation. Its a good thing to know........along with the engine oil levels also.....
 

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Hi all. This is my first post, so I hope I have it in the correct section! I have searched for other posts with the same issue, but haven't found any. I have a new x758 - just 6 hours on it. My concern is that when I am traveling at full speed, I have almost no power steering. The wheel is so hard to turn that I can't use the spinner knob. If I lift my foot off the pedal, I can steer with no effort. It feels to me that the hydraulic system isn't strong enough to keep up with both the transmission and the power steering. Has anyone else experienced this? I will be contacting the dealer, but thought maybe I could find some help here first. Thank you in advance!
Please make sure to post a follow up to this first thread you started once you hear back from your Deere service department. This is likely a situation of low fluid, as the steering systems on these machines have been long used and very trouble free. We would like to hear for sure how your problem is resolved once the Dealer service department has a chance to look over your machine. Looking forward to hearing from you again on this matter. It makes sure any similar issues in the future find your thread helpful in solving their issues.

By the way, welcome to the GTT site with your first posting.....:bigthumb:

:wgtt:
 

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6hrs on the machine, let the dealer fix the problem''


Yes check the fluid and see if it is low , that is my guess. Either way if it is low make the dealer give you the fluid.
 

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I looked on the internet and I found this. I hope it helps some but others will chime in too.


They are not really problematic, just misunderstood. Wonderful machines for flat lawns. I plan to buy one myself too - as they WILL be collectors items.

Go ahead and remove the fender deck so you can see what's going on with the actuators and switches. I'm going to guess that you've got a puntured/rotted/rat chewed actuator. They work off of engine vacuum, which is sent to the proper actuator via the switches at the rear of the machine, on the foot pedal linkage.

The transmission is actually quite simple in operation. It contains two hydros, but setup not how you think. One motor controls the forward/reverse, a smaller motor the steering. It steers by the smaller steering motor spinning a planetary drive around the differential. Hard to explain, but basically it can slow down each axle independantly by how fast or in what direction that smaller motor spins the planetarys. All that is internal to the trans. I doubt there is a problem inside the transmission.

They have all that "reverse logic" actuator stuff to make them steer like a normal tractor in forward or reverse. Twin stick ZTR's can be kind of weird to back up, so this system avoids that by basically flip-flopping the linkage when you go into reverse via the actuators.

I'd recommend getting the technical manual for it - it's great in terms of diagnostics and such. There is actually a diagnostic plug under the dash that you can probe with a test light to make sure all the switches are working correctly, but I can't remember how it works off the top of my head. It's in the tech manual though.

Have fun!
What is described here is the SST, Spin Steer model. Somehow the ole interweb threw you a knuckleball.

Sent from my LGL52VL using Tapatalk
 

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Definitely a fluid issue. That's where I would start. I've had my x758 with the deck on it, a full triple bagger, as well as a spinning deck and powerflo...edge up against a 30deg incline and needing to take a hard 90. The tractor didn't hiccup and diverted fluid as it needed to and i turned the wheel as if there was no incline or severe load on the tractor.

If anyone thinks the x758 is a flat terrain tractor then you're severely misinformed.
 

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If anyone thinks the x758 is a flat terrain tractor then you're severely misinformed.
Wait, does someone actually think that?

I live in the mountains. As you drive from the nearest "big" (lol) city and gain a couple of thousand feet of elevation, you notice something. In the flatter, lower elevation areas, all the landscaping companies are driving around with all sorts of commercial zero turns on their trailers. As you get up into the wilder parts, with all the nasty terrain, the zero turns disappear and are almost exclusively replaced with X758s. There is no substitute for mowing nasty, uneven terrain than an AWD X700.

Why the X758 specifically? AWD for the aforementioned nasty terrain, and diesel for fuel savings (which matter a lot more when you're running 20 of the things all day long all mowing season).

So it should be able to handle all manner of difficult terrain while steering effortlessly.
 

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Wait, does someone actually think that?

I live in the mountains. As you drive from the nearest "big" (lol) city and gain a couple of thousand feet of elevation, you notice something. In the flatter, lower elevation areas, all the landscaping companies are driving around with all sorts of commercial zero turns on their trailers. As you get up into the wilder parts, with all the nasty terrain, the zero turns disappear and are almost exclusively replaced with X758s. There is no substitute for mowing nasty, uneven terrain than an AWD X700.

Why the X758 specifically? AWD for the aforementioned nasty terrain, and diesel for fuel savings (which matter a lot more when you're running 20 of the things all day long all mowing season).

So it should be able to handle all manner of difficult terrain while steering effortlessly.
Its the diesel in the x758. You know that big heavy engine is too much for that wimpy drive system going up hills. Now what you need is that sexy lightweight Kawasaki gasoline engine in the x738. I will happily trade you if you like.
 

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Its the diesel in the x758. You know that big heavy engine is too much for that wimpy drive system going up hills. Now what you need is that sexy lightweight Kawasaki gasoline engine in the x738. I will happily trade you if you like.
It's funny how all the Kawi guys are willing to bite the bullet and take that fat diesel off our hands :laugh:
 

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It's funny how all the Kawi guys are willing to bite the bullet and take that fat diesel off our hands :laugh:
We really just want to share the better life with those who are less fortunate. :laugh:

Those rumbly stinky smelling diesels are just no way to live.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you all for your advice! I'm sorry for the delay in updating, but life gets in the way! The problem was as suspected, the fluid level was 2 quarts low. Thanks again to all!
 

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Thank you all for your advice! I'm sorry for the delay in updating, but life gets in the way! The problem was as suspected, the fluid level was 2 quarts low. Thanks again to all!
Thank you for completing this thread to conclusion.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hey everyone, wanted to update this thread and ask for more advice. I thought the problem went away after adding more fluid, but as the summer went on, I realized it was marginally better, but not right. I had it to the dealer for the 50 hour service and they couldn't find anything wrong. Then the owner of the dealership came out to my house and tried mowing. He was able to duplicate the issue and we are now thinking that the pump may be bad. I've got a couple weeks before I can take it back to him. I have done additional research and it seems there was a certain serial number range of Tuff Torq K90s that did have issues. Tuff Torq's website does not show a K90, but the K92 seems to be nearly identical. I'm thinking that the K90 is proprietary to JD. My question now is, does anyone know where is the serial number located on this transmission? Thanks in advance!
 

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We really just want to share the better life with those who are less fortunate. :laugh:

Those rumbly stinky smelling diesels are just no way to live.
Nope, not me. I'll keep my gas guzzling Kawasaki. By the way, how much does that special no gel additive or block heater cost? :gizmo:
 
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