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Discussion Starter #1

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What an incredible high quality restoration. Drat. I've got a broken down IH 460 Utility out by the shed that I'm contemplating scrapping. It's sad, cuz I know it's never going to look like that Wheatland. Sad, because the Utilities had a nice little chunky look to them, but, at best, I'd be swapping dollars to redo it, at worst, I'd be pouring money down a hole. I know it's the right decision to move on, but I have a hard time throwing stuff away. A great truth in life, eventually most things become valued or devalued by their weight.
 

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IH 660.jpg

Interesting to see that PTO still operates at 540 rpm.

What are the two gears on the left . . . "D" and "TA"?

That's really an impressive restoration! :hi:
 

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Interesting to see that PTO still operates at 540 rpm.

What are the two gears on the left . . . "D" and "TA"?

That's really an impressive restoration! :hi:
The 540 PTO has been standard for a very long time.

TA was an option on some of the older Farmall and IH tractors. It stands for Torque Amplifier. It was basically an additional gearbox with two speeds and it's own clutch. If you were working in the field and the tractor started to bog down, you could shift the TA into low without using the main clutch in order to get a little more power. "D" is for direct, or high gear. "TA" is for the low range. This was an advantage because older tractors, and even some still today were designed with non-synchronized transmissions. In order to shift the numbered gears, you needed to come to a full stop. If you're pulling a ground engaging implement that's really biting in, coming to a complete stop could kill your momentum and make it very difficult to get moving again. That was the advantage of the TA- you didn't have to stop in order to get a little more torque.
 

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Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
That's some good info 56.

The TA is not thought of as being well designed by some. They have been known to be the source and cause of many unhappy operators. Now days, it's usually better to just replace a worn out TA instead of attempting to repair it. There have been times where a TA has to be replaced when the tractor can no longer be operated even in Direct Drive or HIGH. That's one of the design flaws, IMO.

On some of the later model IH tractors with TA's, they were operated with cables instead of linkage. It was not uncommon for the cable to rust and freeze up. This has led to costly repairs.

I've seen several Farmalls that had the TA linkage removed since the LOW side wore out. There are many IH tractors out there that did not come from the factory with Torque Amplifiers, but was an option at that time.. I'm so used to seeing them with TA's, that they appear odd without them.
 

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The TA is not thought of as being well designed by some. They have been known to be the source and cause of many unhappy operators. Now days, it's usually better to just replace a worn out TA instead of attempting to repair it. There have been times where a TA has to be replaced when the tractor can no longer be operated even in Direct Drive or HIGH. That's one of the design flaws, IMO.

I almost said "TA is for Torque Amplifier. It was a complex system that IH used to add weight to their tractors, and served no other known purpose." :laugh::laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
What an incredible high quality restoration. Drat. I've got a broken down IH 460 Utility out by the shed that I'm contemplating scrapping. It's sad, cuz I know it's never going to look like that Wheatland. Sad, because the Utilities had a nice little chunky look to them, but, at best, I'd be swapping dollars to redo it, at worst, I'd be pouring money down a hole. I know it's the right decision to move on, but I have a hard time throwing stuff away. A great truth in life, eventually most things become valued or devalued by their weight.
Maybe the tractor bug will bite and convince you to restore it instead of scrapping. Even as much as I love old iron, there have been times I've questioned my decision to fix an old tractor up.
If you look at it by dollars alone, that will probably discourage most folks. But, if you look at old iron with love and admiration and the want to preserve a piece of the past, the expense can be given a back seat.

The purr of the engine, the smell of fresh paint, and just getting to operate something old is rewarding. It's also neat when there's a story and names that go along with the history of the tractor.
 

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The 540 PTO has been standard for a very long time.

TA was an option on some of the older Farmall and IH tractors. It stands for Torque Amplifier. It was basically an additional gearbox with two speeds and it's own clutch. If you were working in the field and the tractor started to bog down, you could shift the TA into low without using the main clutch in order to get a little more power. "D" is for direct, or high gear. "TA" is for the low range. This was an advantage because older tractors, and even some still today were designed with non-synchronized transmissions. In order to shift the numbered gears, you needed to come to a full stop. If you're pulling a ground engaging implement that's really biting in, coming to a complete stop could kill your momentum and make it very difficult to get moving again. That was the advantage of the TA- you didn't have to stop in order to get a little more torque.
My dads old 330 utility had a TA in it. We would use it at times but it was limited in the amount that we used it.
 
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