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Discussion Starter #1
Ive found several topics here on york rakes, many are for tractors other than the 1025r. Obviously soil conditions in your area and intended use would have a huge impact on the size your machine will handle. The york rake is one of the most basic of our implements so it could potentially be the cheapest and have the fewest options. Probably the least variation between brands. The Tarter from TSC looks decent and maybe one of the least expensive. They even offer wheels to be added. Most of our local soils are RELATIVELY stone free and a nice loam, not a lot of clay. I have a long background in running Bobcats but we never used york rakes, only "Rockhounds" so I am basing a decision on assumptions. I would think the 1025r would easily handle a 5ft rake but is 6 too much? As much as I prefer hydraulic control, I am leaning on the addition of wheels. It seems like its worth lthe cost. They remind me of training wheels in appearance and function BUT if they help do a better job, should I really care what it looks like? What have you 1025r owners found to be the best size rake for your machines? Do you experienced operators prefer wheels or going naked? I think a great option would be hydraulic angling but I guess that would require either a diverter or disconnecting the loader. I would definitely want full use of the loader when raking. For now I guess I would be stuck with manual angling. If it became worth it I guess a diverter could be added as well as a simple hydraulic angling cylinder. Of the TSC lines I opted for the yellow tiller. The salesperson actually didnt want to sell me the yellow one for a SCUT. I had to insist. In york rakes I just dont see a lot of difference between the yellow and orange 5 ft versions. Does anyone else see a difference I missed?
Ray
 

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First off, GET the wheels.
I would almost bet the SCUT version has shorter tines. A SCUT has smaller tires and does not lift as high.
 

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I have the 60 inch heavy duty Tarter brand rake. I don't have the wheels but they would be a nice addition. I used to use the rake on a 2210, which is a SCUT and about 2 models older than the 1series. It pulled it just fine.

Do your shopping, there are lots of little differences between rake brands, mostly centered on the material and design of how they attach the tines to the cross bar. If you have a quick hitch, make sure its compatible. Make sure your tines are robust and won't bend with heavy use. Also make sure the metal the tines attach too is robust and not flimsy. When a rake fails that's where it usually fails at. Mine is a manual adjust and have never had it be much of an issue.

Good luck with your search. It's a very useful implement. You can go bigger than 60 inches on a SCUT, but if you pull heavy material you may find your self bogging down. Your tractor, regardless of size, will stop instantly if you hook a big root or rock in the ground, so just be prepared. That's why you need to make sure the rake is pretty robust, they don't lead an easy life. If you are just leveling a gravel drive it should not be any big deal to go to 72 inches, IMHO.
 
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I'd echo the wheel necessity. It is too difficult to grade/landscape without them. Likewise, 69project makes very good points on the tine bar and how the tines attaches.

I fell into a bargain on a used LandPride 60". It is very well built--probably at the top end of quality. I added the wheel kit and they also manufacture a flip blade option. They offered two wheels kits, on with the hard rubber permanently mounted tire and the other with a wide pneumatic tire. While the latter was considerably more expensive, the wider tires don't "plow" trenches when working in soft material, especially if it has any depth.

It was a good thing I scored such a bargain on the used rake, because the wheel kit and flip down blade were $900.

I built the front storage caster stand.

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I have a 7 foot (84 inch) landscape rake,, and i have used it many times behind the JD 650,,



A landscape rake can not engage the ground like a scraper blade, or box blade can.

Because of that, My JD 650 has only run out of traction 3 or 4 times, even then, all I had to do was lift the rake a little,,
the JD 650 has never run out of horsepower,, and it only has about half the horsepower the 1025 has,,,

My plan was to use the 84 inch rake,, if it was too wide,, the sawsall would adjust the width quickly,,
The width has been perfect,,

If you get the wide rake, you, at most, would need fluid filled tires, and wheel weights.
 

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Howdy. I have this 5 ft rake I use behind Betsy. I am thinking about putting wheels on it. I have used it for fixing my drive, cleaning up piles of leaves/branches, lots of rocks.

Don't know what I would do without it...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In mybsesrch, I have come accross a lightly used 6 ft County Line. This is the yellow one mde by Tarter. New, a 6 ft is $579 on sale. The 5 ft I was plqnning to get is $500. This slightly used 6 ft is $375. The difference would pay for most of the wheel kit. Its q 3 hr round trip but an easy drive and I dont mind that. I think this is the way to go. Worst case...I trim it. I would bet with the wheels itll be fine. I hope spring gets here so9n before I end up spending everything I have to buy attachments I dont need!
 

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I'd echo the wheel necessity. It is too difficult to grade/landscape without them. Likewise, 69project makes very good points on the tine bar and how the tines attaches.

I fell into a bargain on a used LandPride 60". It is very well built--probably at the top end of quality. I added the wheel kit and they also manufacture a flip blade option. They offered two wheels kits, on with the hard rubber permanently mounted tire and the other with a wide pneumatic tire. While the latter was considerably more expensive, the wider tires don't "plow" trenches when working in soft material, especially if it has any depth.

It was a good thing I scored such a bargain on the used rake, because the wheel kit and flip down blade were $900.
I built the front storage caster stand.
I made a big mistake soooo many years ago, that's a big problem I have with ours. We have narrow solid rubber tires.
 

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I have a 7 foot (84 inch) landscape rake,, and i have used it many times behind the JD 650,,



A landscape rake can not engage the ground like a scraper blade, or box blade can.

Because of that, My JD 650 has only run out of traction 3 or 4 times, even then, all I had to do was lift the rake a little,,
the JD 650 has never run out of horsepower,, and it only has about half the horsepower the 1025 has,,,

My plan was to use the 84 inch rake,, if it was too wide,, the sawsall would adjust the width quickly,,
The width has been perfect,,

If you get the wide rake, you, at most, would need fluid filled tires, and wheel weights.
Thank you for this post. I read about using a landscape rake as a snow plow years ago, but at that time I did not have a gravel drive, so it was forgotten. I currently have a large gravel area to plow snow from. Because the area is not flat, it was a pain to plow with a front blade. After we got 7+ inches of snow last night, I decided to give the landscape rake a try. The landscape rake made plowing the gravel area a breeze. It took a fraction of the time that plowing with a blade took & very little gravel was pulled up.
 

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